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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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ficer. Major Buckner then assumed command; and, by his good conduct, has well earned promotion. My staff-officers, Capt. Wagner, A. A.G., Capt. Beeler, A. C.S., (volunteer aid that day,) Captain Edsall, Ins. Gen., McElpatrick, Top. Eng., Lieuts. iquely from left to right, as coolly as if on parade. Inquiring who held the extreme left, the General was answered, Colonel Wagner's brigade. Tell Wagner to hold his position at all hazards. Soon after Colonel Wagner replied, laconically: Say to Wagner to hold his position at all hazards. Soon after Colonel Wagner replied, laconically: Say to the General I will. Down at the tollgate, on the pike, we got another blizzard, with an interlude of Minies, which whistled about with an admonitory slit. The shifting scene of the battle now carried the General back to the centre of the field. ThColonel Wagner replied, laconically: Say to the General I will. Down at the tollgate, on the pike, we got another blizzard, with an interlude of Minies, which whistled about with an admonitory slit. The shifting scene of the battle now carried the General back to the centre of the field. The enemy were streaming through the woods a few hundred yards in front. The forest was populous with them. Our batteries were dashing across the plain with frightful vehemence, wheeling into position and firing with terrific rapidity. The rebel art
l be exposed is Fort Wagner, and one fixes his eye on it and on the Weehawken, approaching nearer and nearer, for the fleet will there undergo its first fiery baptism. Now, then, she comes within range of the fort: no fire. She passes across it: still no fire! The second ship comes up, and meets the same silent reception; and so on, one by one, till, with the Keokuk, the whole nine file by without a single shot from this seemingly formidable work. Meantime, while the fleet is passing Wagner unmolested, the leading vessel has come up with the next rebel work--Battery Bee. The same silent reception for her; the same silent reception for the whole fleet! What is the meaning of this? The enemy is obviously holding back his fire until he can deliver it with the greatest possible effect. The line has now passed across the front of Morris Island, and rounds to make the entrance of the harbor, coming up within the circle of the fire of Fort Sumter and the batteries on Sullivan's
olting act in the bloody drama was the ordering ashore of twenty negroes, drawing them up in line, one man holding a lantern up by the side of their faces, while the murderers shot them, one by one, through the head. This inhuman butchery was within three yards of the boat. One negro alone of all that were shot is alive. Christ. Habacher, who lives near Hamilton's Mill, in this city, was aboard, but managed to hide his money, and got off scot free. Charley, formerly bar-keeper for Christian Wagner, in Jefferson City, was robbed of every dollar he had, some four hundred and fifty dollars. Geo. Schriver, of this city, was led out to be shot, and a watchman on the boat halloed, Hold on there; he is one of my deck-hands, and they led him back, taking seventy-two dollars from him, being all he had except twenty dollars, which he had secreted on the boat. George Morenstecker, a grocer, on the corner of Tenth street and Frederick avenue, in this city, and a Captain in the Thirty-thir