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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wagner or search for Wagner in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
at that time imperfect, the immediate fall of Wagner would gravely impair the safety of Charleston t once settled down into an endeavor to reduce Wagner by parallels and trenches. Time was necessary directly for a position between the fleet and Wagner. One shot was fired over her, but in a momentore needed. Serious injury had been done to Wagner, injury, indeed, that a short continuance of tht that the grand old fort was safe so long as Wagner held out. But one morning a new battery openedstroyed. The line of rifle pits in front of Wagner had been gallantly held by our men during the uncertain. The ground between his front and Wagner was thickly studded with torpedoes, his left ftillery, to keep down the active resistance of Wagner, and to this end every gun ashore and afloat wund their painful antithesis in—the silence of Wagner. The end had come. All through the 6th the n, was saved. The enemy at once occupied both Wagner and Gregg, and Morris Island, in its entirety,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
orris Island from one end of it to the other, then crosses to the northward and passes between Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island, and Fort Sumter, built upon a shoal about midway between the two islands. From this rapid sketch, reference being had to the map, it will be readily appreciated that from the base held by the enemy, a front attack upon Charleston could begin here and nowhere else; and that, as the defences of the inner harbor were at that time imperfect, the immediate fall of Wagner would gravely impair the safety of Charleston also. But that little mound of sand had its history to make, a story that will ever bring a flush of honest pride to the face of every man who participated in the long defence. As soon as we had reported to Colonel Graham, the troops were put into position, the Eighteenth battalion in the salient, the Twelfth upon its right, and the First Georgia on the left, occupying the flanking curtain and the sea face, to which allusion has been made. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
he at once settled down into an endeavor to reduce Wagner by parallels and trenches. Time was necessary to deered directly for a position between the fleet and Wagner. One shot was fired over her, but in a moment the or more needed. Serious injury had been done to Wagner, injury, indeed, that a short continuance of the fithought that the grand old fort was safe so long as Wagner held out. But one morning a new battery opened; thead destroyed. The line of rifle pits in front of Wagner had been gallantly held by our men during the siegeully uncertain. The ground between his front and Wagner was thickly studded with torpedoes, his left flank in artillery, to keep down the active resistance of Wagner, and to this end every gun ashore and afloat was tund found their painful antithesis in—the silence of Wagner. The end had come. All through the 6th the bombarrison, was saved. The enemy at once occupied both Wagner and Gregg, and Morris Island, in its entirety, was