hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wagner or search for Wagner in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal service Corps. [Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., May 2, 1897.] (search)
d night read the signals as they passed from station to station of the United States Army and Navy. To them we owe the preservation of Sumter, Johnson, Gregg and Wagner, on several occasions, those forts being forewarned of attacks to be made, and consequently prepared to resist the same. I have so far spoken only of the servicespark and do the deed. Slowly the Ironsides steamed around, delivering one terrific broadside after another. Ever and anon the flag would wig-wag on Gregg, but Wagner was still; then that on Wagner, but Gregg's did not reply, and so it seemed that hours passed. At last both flags waved. The key was touched once and again. ThWagner, but Gregg's did not reply, and so it seemed that hours passed. At last both flags waved. The key was touched once and again. There was no answering explosion. Again in this report we find the following: Though non-combatants, none ran greater risks than the Signal Corps. Perched on the highest and most conspicuous spots of Battery Gregg, flag in hand, the cynosure of all eyes, both friend and foe, exposed to the fire of sharpshooters and artillery,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
on such food was harsh treatment indeed. The reader may ask, what was all this for? Well, for fighting against the best government the world ever saw. A counter move. The Confederates were told at the time, this was a counter move on the military chess-board, by the Federal Government, for alleged ill-treatment of Andersonville prisoners, said to be confined in the lower portion of Charleston, to prevent that part of it from being destroyed by the heavy seige guns in Gregg and Wagner, that were firing on Charleston night and day, having a powerful auxiliary in the Swamp Angel, the nearest gun to Charleston. At the expiration of forty-five days, the prisoners placed under fire, were removed and put on board a steamer and sent to Fort Pulaski. Here the retaliation was continued, causing many deaths. The fort being somewhat crowded, a portion of the prisoners were sent to Hilton Head. Here as elsewhere, there was great suffering. Being immediately on the coast, the atm