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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
lived at the corner of Salem and Fulton streets. Opposite the Gregg estate, on the east side of Main street, next to the river, was the blacksmith shop of Nathan W. Wait, which, strangely enough, was about the only building in the neighborhood which was not consumed on the memorable night of November 2, 1850. Mr. Wait succeedeMr. Wait succeeded his father, Nathan Wait, who started the business on the same spot in 1783. The property remained in the family until taken by the Metropolitan Park Commission, in 1901. Mr. Wait's dwelling house was next south of his shop. He went into it in 1826. After it was burned, he built the house now standing on the site. The neMr. Wait's dwelling house was next south of his shop. He went into it in 1826. After it was burned, he built the house now standing on the site. The next building was occupied by William S. Barker grocer, and Leonard Johnson, dealer in grain and meal on the lower floor. James Hyde, painter, occupied the second floor. There were two long oat troughs at the side of the street for feeding horses. The drivers could get gingerbread, crackers, cheese, and beer in the store while t
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
ine were destroyed with the stable. Next to the Gregg estate was Timothy Cotting's house, blacksmith shop and two stables, totally destroyed. Mr. Nathan Barker occupied part of the dwelling. Mr. George Lynne's Symmes. house, blacksmith shop and stable came next and were also destroyed. The Misses Tufts' dwelling and Richard Tufts' wheelwright shop on the same side were also laid in ashes. On the opposite side of Main street the fire commenced at the bridge with the dwelling of Nathan W. Wait, and swept down Daniel Lawrence's store and dwelling house Jas. Hyde's dwelling and store, Elias Tufts' wheelwright shop and dwelling, George E. Willis' tinware shop and dwelling, Mitchell's barber shop and dwelling, Benj. Parker's dwelling and stable, Moses Merrill and Son's paint shop, and Hartshorn's harness shop (all in one building). A ten-footer, occupied by an Irish family and three stables, were all totally destroyed. The conflagration swept on before a strong northwest wind u
ises, on Union and Main street to the Sparrell estate. The three dwelling houses next south of the police station, and others in the rear, are on land which was Mr. Wait's orchard. Mr. Wait's shop was near Cradock bridge; he carried on business there for fifty years. Brooks' history accords him the honor of being the first to reMr. Wait's shop was near Cradock bridge; he carried on business there for fifty years. Brooks' history accords him the honor of being the first to rescue a fugitive slave in the United States. He died in Medford, January 5, 1840. Jonathan Perkins, who married Nathan Wait's daughter, built, lived and died in the third house from the police station. It was the first dwelling built in Mr. Wait's orchard. John Sparrell, ship builder, surveyor of land, wood and lumber, and geneMr. Wait's orchard. John Sparrell, ship builder, surveyor of land, wood and lumber, and general business man, owned the next lot. His house is still in the possession of his family, and is known as No. 104 Main street. Captain Sparrell died March 29, 1876. Next south stands the house which in 1835 was the home of Benjamin Pratt, mason. These three estates, with gardens and orchards extending to Union street, were ve