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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for C. C. Walcott or search for C. C. Walcott in all documents.

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chments, and then drew back to Griswoldville, where Walcott's brigade of infantry joined him to cover that flanailroads. The enemy came out of Macon and attacked Walcott in position, but was so roughly handled that he nevon toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on t the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pielsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flaterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better offi in our vicinity about ten thousand. The attack on Walcott was made, I think, by militia, mingled with some olhe rank of Major-General, by brevet: Brigadier-General C. C. Walcott, for special gallantry at the battle of
on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in f counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artmet in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the tro
breast of General Corse; General Hazen moving toward Irwinton General Blair moving along the railroad, and destroying it. I propose, with your sanction, to move across the Oconee River at two points; one, six miles below the railroad bridge at Ball's Ferry; the other, two and a half miles above the railroad bridge at Jackson's Ferry. I have already forwarded to you despatches captured. Prisoners still estimate the strength of the enemy in our vicinity about ten thousand. The attack on Walcott was made, I think, by militia, mingled with some old troops retained at Macon. The number of prisoners of war in my hands: In the Seventeenth corps, thirty-five enlisted men; in the Fifteenth corps, eighty enlisted men. Total, one hundred and fifteen. I believe the cavalry have some fifty or sixty more in addition. We have about forty-five wounded of our own men. The number of bales of cotton reported officially to have been burned is two thousand one hundred and thirty. A large cotto