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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 93 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 46 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 6 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry Walke or search for Henry Walke in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

oote. U. S. Flag-ship Cincinnati, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Feb. 6. The gunboats under my command, the Essex, Commander Porter; the Carondelet, Commander Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander Stembel; the St. Louis, Lieut. Commanding Paulding; the Conestoga, Lieut. Commanding Phelps; the Tyler, Lieut. Commanding Gwin; andn Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, with the iron-clad gunboats Cincinnati, Commander Stembel, (the flag-ship;) the Essex, Commander Porter; the Carondelet, Commander Walke; and the St. Louis, Lieut. Commanding Paulding; also taking with me the three old gunboats Conestoga, Lieut. Commanding Phelps; the Tyler, Lieut. Commanding G Had they been suffered to remain and explode, as they were intended to do, they would doubtless have inflicted serious damage to the boats; but Capts. Phelps and Walke succeeded in removing them without injury. During this time, a small river steamer, which had been employed by the rebels as a ferry-boat, between the Fort and th
ntry. Report of Brig.-Gen. Cullum. Cairo, February 17, 1862. To Major-General MeClellan: The Union flags floats over Fort Donelson. The Carondelet, Capt. Walke, brings the glorious intelligence. The Fort surrendered at nine o'clock yesterday (Sunday) morning. Gens. Johnston (A. Sidney) and Buckner, and fifteen thouas, therefore, with no little gratification that information was at last received, about noon on Thursday, that the avant courier of the fleet, the Carondelet, Lieut. Walke, had arrived below the Fort. In the afternoon the report of her guns was received with cheer upon cheer by the troops encircling the beleaguered Fort. LieuLieut. Walke's operations this afternoon, although partaking more of the nature of a reconnoissance, were considered by the rebel officers, as I have since ascertained, as one of the most formidable attacks they had to encounter. Hidden behind a jutting promontory of the river-bank, the Carondelet itself secure from the heavier shots
and Donelson, his wings isolated from each other and turned, compelling thus the evacuation of his stronghold of Bowling Green first, and now Columbus. The flotilla under Flag-Officer Foote consisted of six gunboats, commanded by Capts. Dove, Walke, Stemble, Paulding, Thompson and Shirk, and four mortar-boats, in charge of Capt. Phelps, United States Navy, assisted by Lieut. Ford, advance corps United States Army, and three transports, conveying Col. Buford's Twenty-seventh Illinois regimenn to be cut, and thus saved the lives of the garrison. While I cannot express too strongly my admiration of the gallantry and wise counsels of the distinguished aid and engineer of General halleck, Gen. Collum, I must add, that Commanders Davis, Walke and Stemble, and Lieuts. Commanding Paulding, Thompson, Shirk and Phelps — the latter being in command of the mortar division, assisted by Lieut. Luford, of the Ordnance corps of the United States Army--nobly performed their duty. I have my f
on board the gunboat Carondelet, off New-Madrid, April 5. on the thirtieth of March Com. Foote addressed to Capt. Henry Walke, commanding the gunboat Carondelet, the following order: U. S. Flag-steamer Benton, Off Island No.10, March 3rotection of God, who rules the world and commands all things, I am, very respectfully, A. H. Foote, Flag-Officer. Commander H. Walke, Commanding Carondelet. P. S.--Should you meet with disaster, you will, as a last resort, destroy the steam mhich they conducted themselves last night under the trying circumstances attending the daring exploit of that boat: Henry Walke, U. S.N. R. M. Wade, First Master. Relieved by Wm. R. Hoel, First Master of U. S. gunboat Cincinnati Richard H Flag-Officer Foote: Navy Department, April 12, 1862. Sir: The Department desires to convey to the commander, Henry Walke, and the officers and men of the Carondelet, also to Acting First Master Hoel, of the Cincinnati, who volunteered for
nsula opposite Island No.10--and for the idea of which I am indebted to Gen. Schuyler Hamilton--was completed by Col. Bissell's Engineer regiment, and four steamers were brought through on the night of the sixth. The heavy batteries I had thrown up below Tiptonville completely commanded the lowest point of the high ground on the Tennessee shore, entirely cutting off the enemy's retreat by water; his retreat by land has never been possible through the swamps. On the night of the fourth, Captain Walke, of the navy, ran the enemy's batteries at Island No.10, with the gunboat Carondelet, and reported to me here. On the night of the sixth, the gunboat Pittsburgh also ran the blockade. Our transports were brought into the river from the bayou, where they had been kept concealed; at daylight on the seventh, had Paine's division loaded. The canal had been a prodigiously laborious work. It was twelve miles long, six miles of which were through heavy timber, which had to be sawed off by h
d and deserted by the enemy, who had set fire to a private residence there, and upon whom we fired as they ran off. A large quantity of ammunition was left by them at each fort. I then made the required signal, crossed over to our army, received further instructions from Gen. Pope, and covered their disembarkation on the Tennessee shore, at the captured fort, above Point Pleasant. At evening, we steamed down to our camp, opposite the enemy's fort, at this place, headed the gunboats for the enemy's battery, until early this morning, when we got under way, and crossed over to Tiptonville, the enemy having disappeared. The officers and crew of this vessel, during the trials and dangers of the battle, conducted them-selves with admirable coolness and ability. To do justice to many of them, will require a more detailed letter. Most respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, H. Walke, Commander U. S.N. To Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, Commander U. S. Naval Forces, Western Waters.