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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 21 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 13 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, Amasa 1799-1875 (search)
Walker, Amasa 1799-1875 Political economist; born in Woodstock, Conn., May 4, 1799; educated in North Brookfield, Mass.; Professor of Political Economy at Oberlin College in 1842-49, and at Amherst College in 1861-66; held various political offices in Massachusetts in 1848-62, when he was elected to Congress. He wrote The nature and uses of money and mixed currency, and Science and wealth. He died in North Brookfield, Mass., Oct. 29, 1875.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
ed to in connexion with my review of Dr. Beecher's speech, there was but one feeling manifested toward me, and that of the most enthusiastic kind. What was peculiarly pleasing was to find men of various sects joining in one common panegyric. Among the speakers were Rev. Mr. Norris, Methodist; Isaac Samuel Norris. R. B. Hall. Alanson St. Clair. S. J. May. Henry B. Stanton. George W. Benson. Winslow, Friend; Rev. Mr. Hall, Congregationalist; Rev. Mr. St. Clair, Unitarian, etc., etc. Amasa Walker said that the success of the Liberator was identified with that of the cause. Even now the enemy was exultant because the Liberator was languishing for want of support. It ought to be adopted as the centre, the organ of the Society. We do not all feel perfectly pleased with all Mr. Garrison says. Like Martin Luther, his language is rough and sometimes violent. But Mr. Birney has said, My anti-slavery trumpet would never have roused the country—Garrison alone could do it. The Libera
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
ryport, the Rev. George Trask, of Warren, and Edmund Quincy and Amasa Walker, of Boston, fixed on September 18 as the date, and the Marlboroangs in Judge Story's court, reported by Mr. Garrison in Lib. 8.167. Walker will prepare one on military parades and titles. Others have been with whom he is to attempt what we ask of you. I shall apply to Amasa Walker here to assist me in concocting something of the kind; so that wstrange spectacle to Southern beholders from near or from afar. Amasa Walker was made President pro tem.; Oliver Johnson, Secretary pro tem.;llard, of Cambridge, was elected President, and E. L. Capron and Amasa Walker Vice-Presidents. When the roll of members was about being made ib. 8.168, 172. Peace Society (its executive committee embracing Amasa Walker, Henry Ware, Jr., J. P. Blanchard, and George C. Beckwith), and Society, with Wendell Phillips for President, W. L. Garrison and Amasa Walker among the Vice-Presidents, Edmund Quincy for Treasurer, and Oliv
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ich any anti-slavery periodical can stand—the urging, upon every individual, action consistent with his principles and his conscience. These resolutions, together with kindred testimonials in years past by George Thompson, William Goodell, Amasa Walker, Maria W. Chapman, N. P. Rogers, and others, were afterwards embodied in a circular by the financial committee of the Liberator. On February 13, the New York Executive Committee Lib. 9.35. notified the Massachusetts Board that the contractUpon Church or State, but upon the materials of both. Neither, he continued, is it to abolish slavery by machinery, political or ecclesiastical, but by appeals to the heart. Touching the capital sought to be made of his once having voted for Amasa Walker, Ante, 1.455; 2.288. Mr. Garrison said: I am quoted, by Mr. Birney, as having set the example of Lib. 9.102. voting for a professed abolitionist, and encouraging others to do the same. As to this citation—cui bono? I humbly conceive t
on), 1.234. American Traveller, see Traveller (Boston). American Union for the Relief and Improvement of the Colored Race, founded, 1.469, characterized by A. Walker and L. Tappan, 472, by C. Tappan, 474, proceedings, 473, demise, 474, futility, 2.258. Ames, Ellis [d. 1884, aged 75], witnesses Boston mob, 2.25, 27, 35, cop Breckinridge, 448, seeks fair play for colonizationists, 449; welcomes Thompson, 434, at Groton with him, 451, his host, 453; opposes A. Lawrence, and votes for A. Walker, 455, 2.302, reproaches Whig colored voters, 1: 456, 2.288; political programme, 1.456; harsh language censured, 457, and defended, 458; attempted Unitarian censd change of heading, 54; advice to voters, 81; effect of G.'s Sabbath views on circulation, 113; Mass. A. S. S. assumes risk of publishing, 122, 157; tribute of A. Walker, 122; competition of the Emancipator, 123; enlargement, 123; attacked by Clerical Appeal, 137, 141, accused of being an organ, 156; broadening of scope proposed,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
piece of current intelligence: the Legislature of North Carolina was sitting with closed Cf. ante, p. 159. doors to consider a message from the Governor about Walker's appeal. They had good reason to be alarmed, observed Mr. Garrison, for a better promoter of insurrection was never sent forth to an oppressed people. As one overal numbers of the paper, Lib. 1.69, 77, 85. at no great interval before the Nat Turner rising in Virginia. The Virginia House of Delegates took notice of Walker's appeal in a bill To prevent the circulation of seditious writings (ante, p. 162, James Stuart's Three years in America, and the monthly Abolitionist, p. 98). espectability, had offered a reward of fifteen hundred dollars for the apprehension and prosecution to conviction of any white person circulating the Liberator or Walker's pamphlet, or any other publication of seditious tendency. Similar action was taken at a public meeting in Bethesda Lib. 1.174. (Richmond Co.), Georgia. In
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
olonization agent, Danforth, in the midst of a public debate with Arnold Buffum at Lyceum Hall, Salem, taunted Mr. Garrison with not going South to preach to the slaveholders, and, recalling the handsome rewards offered for him, pointed him out in the audience, with a significant gesture, as this same Lib. 3.42. William Lloyd Garrison for whom he himself had been offered $10,000 by an individual. This incentive to kidnapping was not a harmless device to throw odium on an adversary. Mr. Amasa Walker reported, at the annual meeting of the New-England Anti-Slavery Society in Boston, that he had lately heard all abolitionists Lib. 3.54. denounced in State Street as mischievous men, and one had lately said to him that he wished he had the Editor of the Liberator in an iron cage—he would send him to the Governor of Georgia, who would know what to do with him. Nor did Danforth's malice end there. In a letter written from Boston under date of March 28, 1833, to Col. William L. Stone
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
him. The first time the English abolitionist had heard of the American, Elliott Cresson was his informant. There is, said this unscrupulous person, an incendiary paper, published in Boston by a madman who is in league with a man of the name of Walker, who has recommended the slaves to cut their masters' throats. A little later, encountering Captain Stuart, who had just returned from the United States, Thompson Lib. 3.50. was presented with copies of the Liberator and the Thoughts on Colon make a careful examination of his duty, but must go to Congress unpledged and untrammelled. This response did not satisfy Mr. Garrison, who, on printing the correspondence in the Liberator, said he preferred to give his influence in favor of Amasa Walker (an outspoken Lib. 4.179. abolitionist). He did more, he gave him his vote—the Lib. 4.203. one political vote of his lifetime; and after the election had gone as it could only go at that anti-Republican epoch in Massachusetts, he took t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
rrected, and that argument will take the place of invective; and declared that much was due him for his noble and disinterested efforts. Mr. Garrison replied by denying that the leading Lib. 5.19. anti-slavery men were in sympathy or connection with the new organization: it was the laughing-stock of abolitionists. He took the liberty of appending a private letter from Lewis Tappan, in reference to the late convention in Boston to form what I should call an Anti-Garrison Society. Amasa Walker called this hitting the nail on the head (Lib. 5.27). The promoters of the American Union, said a writer in the N. E. Spectator, hate Garrisonism more than they detest slavery (Lib. 5.26). And a correspondent of the Liberator described the proceedings of the convention as thoroughly imbued with the Hang Garrison spirit (Lib. 5.22). To the Liberator's editorial comments on its proceedings this writer gave his approval: They will meet a hearty response from every truehearted emancipationist
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
ted debates, the most new faces among the members (the fruits of our spring conventions), and the most thorough action. The question of Ante, p. 97. the duty of withdrawing from the support of the U. S. Government on account of its pro-slavery character, and of making the dissolution of the Union our main measure, was the question of the Convention. The debates were very fine. That is, Garrison and Phillips did admirably, C. C. Burleigh very well indeed, on the one side, and Pierpont, Amasa Walker, Hildreth Rev. J. Pierpont. Richard Hildreth. ( Archy Moore The first anti-slavery novel, by the future historian of the United States; the sub-title being The White Slave. It was published towards the close of 1836, and had a powerful effect (Lib. 7: 35, 56.) Lacking the prepared soil on which Uncle Tom's Cabin fell, it failed of the vogue which its fine literary qualities merited; yet in 1846 had reached a sixth edition (Lib. 16.94).) did all that could be done on the other. But
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