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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ler and J. C. Habersham, of his staff, for efficiency and gallant conduct; Col. C. H. Stevens and Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fourth, for the same; and Adjt. J. O. Palmer and Capt. D. F. Hill, of the Twenty-fourth, and other brave and true officers of the same regiment. General Manigault mentioned the following as distinguished for conduct on the field: Col. J. F. Pressley and Lieut.-Col. Julius T. Porcher of the Tenth; Maj. J. L. White and Adjutant Ferrell of the Nineteenth; Capt. C. I. Walker, assistant adjutant-general, and Lieut. William E. Huger, aide-de-camp. These names are given from the reports, but how many are left unmentioned! The men and officers of the line who carried their colonels and lieutenant-colonels and majors and generals forward to victory are worthy of lasting honor. South Carolina has recorded their names on her roll of faithful and devoted soldiers and citizens, and while her archives endure they may be read by their descendants as the witness s
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
ht, being extended southward west of the city. In this fight Manigault's brigade was again engaged. Capt. T. W. Getzen was in command of the Twenty-fourth, and after he and Captain Home were wounded, the gallant Adjt. James O. Ferrell reported to General Manigault that all his captains were now wounded or killed, and the general ordered the adjutant himself to take command. The loss of the Twenty-fourth that day was 53. The Tenth was engaged with like gallantry, its commander, Lieut.-Col. C. Irvin Walker, falling painfully wounded. Lieuts. G. A. Jennison and W. E. Huger, of Manigault's staff, were among the wounded. The brigade made repeated assaults, and left dead and wounded within a few feet of the Federal intrenchments, but the Confederate battle was not successful. The investment of Atlanta was actively pressed after the battles of the latter part of July to the 25th of August, 1864. During that period the Federal line was firmly established on the east, north and west
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
e other son, Hugh, being engaged in the mercantile business at Marion. Lieutenant McLucas is major on the staff of Gen. C. I. Walker, major-general of the South Carolina divisions of the United Confederate Veterans, and is also the historian of Camrd, Murry, and Ruby. Robert W. Shand, a prominent attorney of Columbia, judge advocate-general on the staff of Maj.-Gen. C. I. Walker, commanding the South Carolina division, United Confederate Veterans, was born at Columbia, February 27, 1840. Hartillery, A. N. V., commander of Camp Washington artillery, No. 1102, U. C. V., and aide-de-camp on the staff of Maj.-Gen. C. I. Walker, commanding South Carolina division, U. C. V., was born in Minden, Prussia, on July 4, 1842; was brought by his ply ties by membership in the survivors' association, and Sumter camp, and holds the rank of surgeon on the staff of Gen. C. I. Walker, commanding the division of South Carolina. In 1879 Dr. Simons was married to Serena D. Aiken, of Charleston, and