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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
e Impending crisis in 1860. A reply to his arguments, in imitative style, was made by Horace White in Coin's financial Fool. In the meantime, whatever complacency the average man of business between 1875 and 1890 possessed was rudely shaken by three phenomena: the rapid organization of labour, the trust movement, and the disfranchisement of the negro. The Knights of Labour, the first extensive labour organization in the United States, disturbed the balance of American temper. Said Francis Walker, See Book III, Chap. XXIV. the economist: Rarely has the sceptical, practical, compromising spirit of our people, which leads them to avoid extremes, to distrust large expectations and to take all they can get, down, for anything they have in hand, however promising, so far lost control of our acts and thoughts and feelings. The nascent consciousness of labour was well reflected in Powderley's Thirty years of labour, the author being official head of the Knights. The tendency tow
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: seventy years young 1889-1890; aet. 70-71 (search)
daughter-and sons-in-law. I had many lovely gifts. The house was like a garden of costly flowers. Breakfast was at 12.30; was in very good style. Guests: General Walker, John S. Dwight, E. E. Hale, Mrs. Jack Gardner, Mmes. Bell, Pratt, and Agassiz. Walker made the first speech at the table, H. M. H. Henry Marion Howe. beWalker made the first speech at the table, H. M. H. Henry Marion Howe. being toastmaster. Walker seemed to speak very feelingly, calling me the first citizeness of the country; stood silent a little and sat down. Dwight read a delightful poem; Hale left too soon to do anything. H. introduced J. S. D. thus: Sweetness and light, your name is Dwight. While we sat at table, baskets and bouquets of wondWalker seemed to speak very feelingly, calling me the first citizeness of the country; stood silent a little and sat down. Dwight read a delightful poem; Hale left too soon to do anything. H. introduced J. S. D. thus: Sweetness and light, your name is Dwight. While we sat at table, baskets and bouquets of wonderful flowers kept constantly arriving; the sweet granddaughters brought them in, in a sort of procession lovely to see. It rained in the afternoon, but the house was thronged with visitors, all the same. A sober entry, written the next day, when she was very tired, with a delightful fatigue : but on the day itself she was gay,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
d me quite away. We waited to speak with him. I had a dear grasp of the hand from him. I shook my finger at him and said, Is this resting? He laughed and said, This is the last time. I shall not speak again until I reach Massachusetts. I wrote some lines on coming home, only half expressing my thought, which was that the mother of so brave a son could not have had one coward drop of blood in her veins — another little scrap, too, about the seven devils that Christianity can cast out. General Walker in the afternoon and the Harlands to dinner. They left London to join Mrs. Terry at Schwalbach, lingering for a little on the way in Holland and Belgium. July 27. The Hague. To see Mesdag and his pictures. Found Mesdag a hale man of perhaps fifty years--perhaps less; a fine house, and, besides his own paintings of which we saw a number, a wonderful collection of pictures, mostly modern French, Troyon, Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny. Some good things by a Roman artist, Mancini, whom Me
Vienna, I, 94; II, 182. Villegas, Jose, II, 240, 243, 256. Vincent Hospital, II, 158. Vineyard Haven, I, 342, 387. Vinton, Mr., II, 287. Virginia, I, 29. Viti de Marco, Marchesa de, II, 255. Viti de Marco, Marchese de, II, 255. Voickoff, Alex, I, 350. Voshell, Lucy, II, 344, 345, 347. Waddington, Mary K., II, 9. Waddington, William, II, 9. Wade, Benjamin, I, 321. Wadsworth, William, I, 86. Wagner, Richard, II, 156. Wales, I, 88; II, 166. Walker, Francis, II, 150, 172, 226. Wallace, H. B., I, 134, 271. Wallack's Theatre, I, 143, 352. Walmsley, Mrs., II, 209. Ward, name of, I, 4. Ward, Capt., II, 8. Ward, Anne, I, 19, 22. Ward, Annie, see Mailliard. Ward, Emily A., I, 50, 57, 60, 64. Ward, F. Marion, I, 17, 22, 30, 46-48, 58, 130, 352; II, 108, 174, 175, 411. Ward, Henry, I, 22, 60. Ward, Henry, I, 31, 60; II, 174, 175. Ward, Henry, I, 17, 46-48, 58, 65, 66, 74, 341; II, 160, 277, 288, 411. Ward, He
George P. Maney and Preston Smith. This division, with that of Maj.-Gen. Jones M. Withers, constituted Polk's corps. The Sixteenth Tennessee, Col. John H. Savage; the Thirty-eighth, Col. John C. Carter; the Eighth, Col. W. L. Moore; the Fifty-first, Col. John Chester; the Eighty-fourth, Col. S. S. Stanton, and Carnes' battery, constituted Donelson's brigade. The Fourth and Fifth Tennessee consolidated, Col. O. F. Strahl; the Twenty-fourth, Col. H. L. W. Bratton; the Nineteenth, Col. F. M. Walker; the Thirty-first and Thirty-third consolidated, Col. E. E. Tansil, and Stanford's Mississippi battery, constituted Stewart's brigade. The First and Twenty-seventh Tennessee consolidated, Col. H. R. Feild; the Fourth (Confederate), Col. J. A. McMurray; the Sixth and Ninth consolidated, Col. C. S. Hurt, Capt. Frank Maney's sharpshooters, and Turner's Mississippi battery, constituted Maney's brigade. The One Hundred and Fifty-fourth (senior) Tennessee regiment, Lieut.-Col. M. Magev
, or that which followed Wellington into France, out of Spain. Cheatham lost 195 officers and men, Cleburne, 11. The attempt to turn Cheatham's left was defeated by the prompt action of Brig.-Gen. O. F. Strahl with his brigade. Brig.-Gen. C. G. Harker fell in the attempt to lead his command to a second assault. The angle in Cheatham's line, known to the survivors of Harker's division as dead angle, was held by parts of Maney's and Vaughan's brigades, Maney's brigade commanded by Col. F. M. Walker, Nineteenth Tennessee. It was the weak point in the line, and when the preparation for the assault was made, the division general instructed his command that the position must be held at any cost; that its loss meant more than the loss of a battle. The First and Twenty-seventh, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth and Thirteenth Tennessee held the post of danger and of honor, and to the order of their chief they responded with a ringing cheer that must have chilled the hearts of the advancin