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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 14 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 3 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anne, Queen, (search)
en. Acadia (q. v.) was annexed to England. under the old title of Nova Scotia, or New Scotland. The following year an expedition moved against Quebec. Sir Hovenden Walker arrived at Boston (June 25, 1711) with an English fleet and army, which were joined by New England forces; and on Aug. 15 fifteen men-of-war and forty transeeded to Albany, where a force of about 4,000) men were gathered, a portion of them Iroquois Indians. These forces commenced their march towards Canada Aug. 28. Walker, like Braddock nearly fifty years later. haughtily refused to listen to experienced subordinates, and lost eight ships and about 1,000 men on the rocks at the mouth of the St. Lawrence on the night of Sept. 2. Disheartened by this calamity, Walker returned to England with the remainder of the fleet. and the colonial troops went back to Boston. On hearing of this failure, the land force marching to attack Montreal retraced their steps. Hostilities were now suspended, and peace was, con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Antietam, battle of. (search)
as struggling against constantly increasing numbers on his front; and the National line began to waver, when Hooker, in the van, was wounded and taken from the field. Sumner sent Sedgwick to the support of Crawford, and Gordon and Richardson and French bore down upon the Confederates more to the left. The Nationals now held position at the Dunker Church, and seemed about to grasp the palm of victory (for Jackson and Hood were falling hack), when fresh Confederate troops, under McLaws and Walker, supported by Early, came up. They penetrated the National line and drove it back, when the unflinching Doubleday gave them such a storm of artillery that they, in turn, fell back to their original position. Sedgwick, twice wounded, was carried from the field, and the command of his division devolved on Gen. O. O. Howard. Generals Crawford and Dana were also wounded. Franklin was sent over to assist the hard-pressed Nationals. Forming on Howard's left, he sent Slocum with his division tow
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
complete file is with the New York Historical Society.] Benjamin Franklin born in Boston......Jan. 17, 1706 Haverhill again attacked by the French and Indians......Aug. 29, 1708 Port Royal taken from the French by the English......Oct. 5, 1710 [Name changed from Port Royal to Annapolis, in honor of Queen Anne.] Expedition against Quebec and Canada leaves Boston......July 30, 1711 [The fleet, consisting of fifteen ships-ofwar and forty transports, is under command of Sir Hovenden Walker, and carries seven regiments of veterans from Marlborough's army and a battalion of marines. Eight vessels of this fleet are wrecked in the river St. Lawrence on the night of Aug. 22, 1711, and the remainder return, having accomplished nothing.] Boundary between Massachusetts and: Connecticut located......1713 Schooners invented and built at Cape Ann......1714 Elizabeth Goose marries Thomas Fleet, of Boston......1715 [Her mother is said to have been the veritable Mother G
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
overnor Ingoldsby, acting governor......1709 Expedition fitted out against Montreal; failure......1709 Peter Schuyler takes to England five distinguished chiefs of the Iroquois to visit the Queen......1710 Richard Ingoldsby displaced; Gerardus Beekman acting governor from......April 10, 1710 Robert Hunter, governor, arrives at New York with 3,000 German Lutherans......June 14, 1710 Preparations to invade Canada. Nicholson leaves Albany with 4,000 men, and a fleet under Sir Hovenden Walker sails from Boston with 7,000 men and a fine train of artillery, against Quebec and Montreal......July 30, 1711 Fleet loses eight transports and more than 1,000 men on the rocks at the mouth of the St. Lawrence, and sails for England; the army disbands......1711 Tuscaroras leave North Carolina and join their brethren in New York, thus forming the Six Nations......1712 Pretended discovery of a negro insurrection in New York; nineteen negroes hanged......1712 Schoharie Flats
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
ns the blockade at Charleston, avoiding eleven United States vessels......Dec. 27, 1861 Gen. David Hunter declares free the slaves in Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina......May 9, 1862 Battle of Secessionville (James Island), in which Col. T. G. Lamar defeats the Federals under Gen. Henry W. Benham......June 16, 1862 Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard assumes command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia......Sept. 24, 1862 Gen. J. M. Brannan defeats the Confederates under General Walker in the battle of Pocotaligo......Oct. 22, 1862 Commodore Samuel F. Dupont's squadron is repulsed in the battle of Charleston Harbor......April 7, 1863 Colonel Montgomery, with United States troops, makes a raid from Beaufort up the Combahee River, securing 800 slaves and a quantity of provisions and horses......June, 1863 Federals victorious in the battles of Morris Island, July 10; Fort Wagner, July 11; James Island......July 16, 1863 Fort Wagner bombarded by Gen. Q. A. Gill
f-war and Chap. XXI.} forty transports, was placed under the command of Sir Hovenden Walker; the seven veteran regiments from 1711 Marlborough's army, with a battay of Gaspe, Aug. 14-20. at last began to ascend the St. Lawrence, while Sir Hovenden Walker puzzled himself with contriving Hovenden Walker's <*>rna 121. how he shHovenden Walker's <*>rna 121. how he should secure his vessels during the winter at Quebec. Fearing the ice in the river, freezing to the bottom, would bilge them, as much as if they were to be squeezedne, and, even so, the vessels were carried towards the northern shore. Just as Walker was going to bed, the captain of his ship came down to say that land could be s be lost; I see breakers all around us!—Putting on my gown and slippers, writes Walker, and coming upon deck, I found what he told me to be true. Even then the blindhis suc- 1712. cessful retreat, which to him seemed as glorious as a victory. Walker, 28. Such was the issue of hostilities in the north-east. The failure of t
W. Wadsworth, William, III. 67. Waldenses in New Netherlands, II. 302 Waldron, Richard, III. 180. Walker, Henderson, III. 20. Walker, Sir Hovenden, III. 221. Walpole, III. 325. His indifference to the colonies, 345. Rejects the system of taxing colonies, 383. Averse to war with Spain, 438. Washington, George, III. 467. Wesley, John and Charles, III. 428. West, Francis, I. 196. Weymouth explores the coast, I. 114. Whalley, Edward, II. 34. Wheelwright, John,Walker, Sir Hovenden, III. 221. Walpole, III. 325. His indifference to the colonies, 345. Rejects the system of taxing colonies, 383. Averse to war with Spain, 438. Washington, George, III. 467. Wesley, John and Charles, III. 428. West, Francis, I. 196. Weymouth explores the coast, I. 114. Whalley, Edward, II. 34. Wheelwright, John, I. 388. Removes to Piscataqua, 392. Whitaker, the apostle of Virginia, I. 144. Whitefield, George, III. 429. Apologist of slavery, 448. Wickliffe, a benefactor to America, II. 458. Wilford, Thomas, II. 230. Williams, Eunice, III. 213. Williams, Roger, I. 367. His exile, 377. Plants Providence, 379. His character, 380. William and Mary College founded, III. 25. William of Orange, III. 2. His policy triumphant, 227. False to the liberty of the seas, 230. Willough