Your search returned 66 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
since passed away, his life has been blameless. From being a disobedient, worthless fellow, he has become a gentleman, a gallant soldier, and a true Christian. Dr. Bennett relates the following incident of the battle of Bethel: Captain John Stewart Walker, of the company known as the Virginia life guard, was ordered by the commanding general to take his men from the front, where they were doing good service, to the flank to hold in check a heavy force of the enemy supposed to be moving in that direction. On reaching his new post of danger, Captain Walker drew up his company and addressed them in a few stirring words. He reminded them that God had mercifully preserved them in the heat of battle, and that they were now called to face the enemy in greater numbers; that, as Christians and patriots, they should resolve to do their whole duty to their country; then kneeling down, he called upon a minister, who was a private in the ranks, to offer prayer. When they arose, nearly e
by his Holy Spirit, impressing the hearts of our soldiers, and turning their thoughts to himself in grateful recognition of his merciful dealings with them. During this battle an incident occurred of a deeply interesting character. Captain John Stewart Walker, of the company known as the Virginia life guard, was ordered by the Commanding General to take his men from the front, where they were doing good service, to the flank to hold in check a heavy force of the enemy supposed to be moving in that direction. On reaching his new post of danger, Captain Walker drew up his company and addressed them in a few stirring words. He reminded them that God had mercifully preserved them in the heat of battle, and that they were now called to face the enemy in greater numbers; that, as Christians and patriots, they should resolve to do their whole duty to their country; then, kneeling down, he called upon a minister, who was a private in the ranks, to offer prayer. When they arose, nearly
nt left Goldsboro for Richmond, though having suffered for weeks with sickness, he refused to remain behind. At Petersburg, on account of his serious illness, Gen. Walker deemed it unadvisable to apprise him of the departure of his regiment. He thus wrote to a friend: I learned of their departure after they left, and I sat on the railroad side till midnight to come with Gen. Walker, and came with him notwithstanding his grumbling. On the day of the battle of Ellyson's Mill he was so feeble and exhausted by long sickness that it was absolutely necessary to assist him on and off his horse. He was so weak that it was with difficulty he could sit upright reathed his last, and angel voices in choral strains bade his hero soul welcome to home, sweet home. Worthy to stand by the side of Colonel Smith was Major John Stewart Walker, of the 15th Virginia regiment, who closed a useful and holy life on the bloody hill of Malvern. He entered the army from a sense of duty. The pomp and
e army. Their perseverance in serving the Lord proved that they had on the gospel-armor. Many of them lived through the war, and came out of it strong in the faith of God. Others fell on the field of battle instantly killed. They departed covered with the honors of war and with the glory of a saving faith in Christ. Their record below was one of Christian fidelity — on high, no doubt, it was acceptable to God. Among those who deserve to be specially mentioned are the names of Major John Stewart Walker, an upright, conscientious Christian, and one of the purest men I believe that ever died or lived-also Lieutenants Melville C. Willis and Jones Daniels. The last named two were bosom friends, who likewise fell instantly killed. On the same field and about the same time their lives were yielded a sacrifice to the Southern cause. They were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in death they were not separated. Besides those of the 15th, I have quite a large number of names o
lation to a higher life in heaven. Let us look at the proof of the power of grace as given in this period by our dying soldiers. Lieut. J. P. Duncan fell at his post near Petersburg, Va. His last noble act was to distribute a package of tracts to his men on the subject of heaven. He stepped on a log in rear of his guns to look at the enemy's movements, and was instantly killed. William Smith Patterson, of the Palmetto Sharpshooters, was a noble soldier of Christ and of his country. Colonel Walker, his commander, wrote to his mother: Your son was a gallant young man, and fell bravely doing his duty in the foremost ranks while engaging the enemy. He was never found lacking in his duty either as a soldier or Christian. He was shot through the body, and died almost instantly. When I told her, says Dr. Whitefoord Smith, the sad tidings, her first words were, Glory! glory! glory! The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord. I know he is saf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
om the files of the Dispatch of that time, I quote as follows: A distinguished lawyer, whose age prevented him being in the field, exclaimed to a friend when the battle (Malvern Hill) was raging: I am proud of Richmond. I am proud of my fellow-citizens. I could never have believed it possible for human beings to behave so admirably as they have done to-day. From my soul I am proud of them. In the issue of this paper of the 3d of of July, we find the following notices: Major John Stewart Walker, former captain of the Virginia Life Guards, was killed on Tuesday. He was a gallant officer, and one of our best and most influential citizens. Ellis Munford, son of the Secretary of the Commonwealth, also fell mortally wounded. There also, you will find a long list of the killed and wounded, and notices of the work in the hospitals, and tributes to the noble women in this city, ministering angels of charity then as now. The sons they had sent forth with the Roman matron's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
years, many little incidents of that terrific battle on the summit of Rich mountain, in which over 25 per cent. of the brave boys who went into it on the Confederate side bit the dust. Well and distinctly do I recall this day the fact that Colonel William C. Scott and his full and brave regiment was close by-almost in sight-and that our cry of distress, as our comrades fell like leaves in wintry weather, was unheeded by him. I recall also the fact that one of our men, Waddy S. Bacon (one of Walker's Nicarauga campaigners and filibusters, as brave a man as ever trod the earth), in some way ran the gauntlet of shot and shell on that ever-memorable July II, 1861, and went to Colonel Scott in person, told him of the situation, begged him to go to our help, showed him how an attack in the Federal rear would demoralize the whole Federal force and cause them to flee as if from the wrath to come, and offered to go side by side with him in leading the rear attack. No, Colonel Scott didn't bud
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
m Bethel to Appomattox. There were eight companies in the regiment, organized and composed of men from Richmond and vicinity—to-wit: Company A, Church Hill, city; Company B, Virginia Life Guard, city; Company C, Patrick Henry Rifles, Hanover; Company D, Old Dominion Guard, city; Company E, Ashland Grays, Hanover; Company G, Henrico Southern Guard, Henrico; Company H, Young Guard, city; Company I, Hanover Grays, Hanover. Having lost its colonel (T. P. August, wounded) and major (John Stewart Walker, killed at Malvern Hill), the regiment recruited and reorganized, broke camp on August 30, 1862, near Culpeper Courthouse, and started on its eventful march for the first invasion beyond the Potomac. On August 31st we bivouacked at Fauquier White Sulphur Springs, September 1st, at Gainesville, September 2d, at Bull Run, September 3d, at Leesburg, and September 6th, we crossed the Potomac by fording the river—up to our breast. September 7th, we bivouacked near Frederick City, Md.,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
nderwriter, Capture of the, 136. University of Virginia, Founding of, 353. Vallandigham, C. L., 367. Worsham John H., 148. Virginia, Bill of Rights, 62; her love for the Wright, General H. G., 324. Union, 68: traditions of, 82. Virginia infantry, Career of the 15th regiment, 48; casualties in, at Sharpsburg, 50; 21st and 48th, 147. Virginia Military Institute and other buildings burnt by General Hunter, 179. Virginia to the aid of Massachusetts, 68. Wade, Ben. F., 367. Walker, Major D. N., 51, 328. Walker, Major, John Stewart, killed, 49. Walker, General, R. Lindsay, 327. Wheeler, General, Joseph, 133. White, Dr., Henry Alex., 52. White, Captain Matthew X, Murder of, 187. White Marsh road, Engagement on, 208. Wickham, General W. C., 314. Willis, Captain E. J, 51. Winder, General W. S., killed 149. Winchester, Engagement at, Sept., 1864, 173. Wood, Captain, John Taylor, 137. Yancey, W. L., did not urge the revival of the slave trade, 100.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
time of the year was a treat to the men who had for months been cooped up in trenches. I have heard it said that there was much straggling in the army on that march and that General Lee's army numbered more within two days after the battle of Sharpsburg than it did the morning of the battle. I do not recall that it was so with the Fifteenth Virginia Infantry, which I commanded as senior captain, after the loss of two field officers at Malvern Hill, one of them was the gallant Major John Stewart Walker, who was killed, and our gallant Colonel Thomas P. August, wounded. I know it was a continuous march, day after day, but I do not remember that any of them were forced until two or three days before Sharpsburg. We reached the battlefield of second Manassas two days after the fight and marched by heaps of dead, especially red breeched Zouaves. Tommy Lipscomb and his kettle drum. I do not know whether we were expected to be on hand the day of the battle or not. I do not rec
1 2 3