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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
>the white House at Montgomery. him in his nefarious work, and ostentatiously titled them in imitation of the National Government. He called Robert Toombs to act as Secretary of State ; Charles G. Memminger, as Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, as Secretary of War ; Stephen R. Mallory, as Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, as Postmaster-General. Afterward, Judah P. Benjamin was appointed to be Attorney-General. William M. Browne, late editor of the Washington Constitutis of Davis's privy council, namely, Toombs, Mallory, and Benjamin, had lately left their seats in the National Senate. Their previous career we shall hereafter consider. Memminger was a man of fine culture, and eminent as a lawyer. So also was Walker, whose social and professional position in northern Alabama was inferior to but few. Reagan was a lawyer of ability, and was a judge in Texas when he rebelled against his Government. The Confederates, having assumed for their league a national
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
Mr. Gilchrist, a member of the Alabama Legislature, said to Davis and a portion of his Cabinet (Walker, Benjamin, and Memminger):--Gentlemen, unless you sprinkle blood in the face of the people of Aleaceful arrangement had yet been made. That officer instantly communicated Anderson's remark to Walker, the Confederate Secretary of War, at Montgomery, giving as his words:--I will await the first shot, and if you do not batter us to pieces, we will be starved out in a few days. Walker telegraphed back, that if Major Anderson would state the time when he would evacuate, and agree that, meanwhilgard sent Colonels Chesnut, Chisholm, Pryor (Roger A.), and Captain Lee, with the proposition of Walker, to Major Anderson, when the latter replied that he cordially united with them in a desire to pr the answer was written at half-past 2. At the request of Chesnut and his companions, it Le Roy Pope Walker. was handed to them unsealed. Anderson was ignorant of what his Government had been do
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 (search)
als and citizens. The oath of office was administered to Davis by Howell Cobb, president of the Congress, at the close of his inaugural address. In the evening President Davis held Jefferson Davis. a levee at Estelle Hall, and the city was brilliantly lighted up by bonfires and illuminations. President Davis chose for his constitutional advisers a cabinet comprising Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General. Afterwards, Judah P. Benjamin was made Attorney-General. Two days after President Lincoln's call for troops, President Davis issued a proclamation, in the preamble of which he said the President of the United States had announced the intention of invading the Confederacy with an armed force for the purpose of capturing its fortresses, and thereby