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enry, s. of Thomas (10), m. Katherine Felch 31 Jan. 1728-9, and had Mary, b. 19 Oct. 1729, m. Moses Richardson before 1755, and d. 10 Mar. 1812, a. 82; Henry the f. was a currier, and resided on the easterly side of Mason Street, near the Common. He is styled junior on the records, with reference to Deacon Henry Prentice, who was about a dozen years his senior. He rem. to Shrewsbury, which is named as his residence 1771, in the will of his brother William. He was prob. the same who m. Mary Walker 16 Oct. 1752 (still styled junior, Deacon Prentice being yet alive), and had John, b. 27 July 1753; Thomas, b. 27 May 1755; Jerusha, b. 17 Oct. 1757; William, b. 12 Sept. 1760; Samuel, b. 10 June 1763; the last named is recorded as son of Henry Prentice of Shrewsbury. It appears probable that he subsequently returned, as a Henry Prentice d. here, 23 Aug. 1787, said to be a. 82, which very nearly corresponds with his age. 22. William, s. of Thomas (10), was a cordwainer, and inherited
enry, s. of Thomas (10), m. Katherine Felch 31 Jan. 1728-9, and had Mary, b. 19 Oct. 1729, m. Moses Richardson before 1755, and d. 10 Mar. 1812, a. 82; Henry the f. was a currier, and resided on the easterly side of Mason Street, near the Common. He is styled junior on the records, with reference to Deacon Henry Prentice, who was about a dozen years his senior. He rem. to Shrewsbury, which is named as his residence 1771, in the will of his brother William. He was prob. the same who m. Mary Walker 16 Oct. 1752 (still styled junior, Deacon Prentice being yet alive), and had John, b. 27 July 1753; Thomas, b. 27 May 1755; Jerusha, b. 17 Oct. 1757; William, b. 12 Sept. 1760; Samuel, b. 10 June 1763; the last named is recorded as son of Henry Prentice of Shrewsbury. It appears probable that he subsequently returned, as a Henry Prentice d. here, 23 Aug. 1787, said to be a. 82, which very nearly corresponds with his age. 22. William, s. of Thomas (10), was a cordwainer, and inherited
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e cot of a New York soldier, upon whose brow death had stamped his seal, I kneeled to pray for his departing soul, when a gush of black vomit struck me full in the face and breast, and the prayer was interrupted by the poor fellow's apologies and assurances that he could not help it. I wiped his face more tenderly than I did my own and held his hand for half an hour later, when his spirit passed away. A prisoner for a few weeks who excited considerable interest and amusement was Miss Dr. Mary Walker. She had a room to herself in Castle Thunder, and sometimes was permitted to stroll into the streets, where her display of Bloomer costume, blouse, trowsers and boots secured her a following of astonished and admiring boys. She was quite chatty, and seemed rather to enjoy the notoriety of her position. She claimed to be a surgeon in the Federal army, and, I believe, had some sort of commission, or permission perhaps as hospital nurse to travel with the army. Captain Gibbs, command
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
e cot of a New York soldier, upon whose brow death had stamped his seal, I kneeled to pray for his departing soul, when a gush of black vomit struck me full in the face and breast, and the prayer was interrupted by the poor fellow's apologies and assurances that he could not help it. I wiped his face more tenderly than I did my own and held his hand for half an hour later, when his spirit passed away. A prisoner for a few weeks who excited considerable interest and amusement was Miss Dr. Mary Walker. She had a room to herself in Castle Thunder, and sometimes was permitted to stroll into the streets, where her display of Bloomer costume, blouse, trowsers and boots secured her a following of astonished and admiring boys. She was quite chatty, and seemed rather to enjoy the notoriety of her position. She claimed to be a surgeon in the Federal army, and, I believe, had some sort of commission, or permission perhaps as hospital nurse to travel with the army. Captain Gibbs, command
nd (in February) Samuel Barrett, $150. Seven primary schools went into effect May 16, 1825. They were located according to the recommendation of last year. For the first time we are permitted to give the names of the primary teachers of Charlestown, for up to this date, except for a brief period about 1813, these schools were of a private character, and the mistresses depended upon their patrons for reimbursement. They were: Mrs. Polly Jaquith, Mrs. Mary Thompson, Mrs. Hannah Rea, Mrs. Mary Walker, Miss Lucy Wyman (succeeded by Miss Rebecca French), Miss Adeline Hyde, and Miss Roxanna Jones. The whole number in these schools was 445; present at the examinations, 385. The trustees are free to declare their belief that the benefit of these institutions will fully meet the most sanguine anticipations of their friends. The children are put upon a regular course of instruction, alike in all these schools, and are kept in good order. The trustees are confident that a school of fifty
ot Valentine, for Winter Hill; and Joseph S. Hastings, for the Russell district. In September Mr. Walker resigned at the Neck, to go to the Hawes school, South Boston, and Amos P. Baker was elected ter's Third Book, Boston Atlas, Frost's Grammar. Second class, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Walker's Dictionary, Natural Reader, Frost's Grammar, Field's American Geography and Atlas. First class, the First Class Book, Young Ladies' Class Book, Walker's Dictionary, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Worcester's Geography, or Elements of History, Progressive Exercises in Composition. Writiny schools this year, at a maximum salary of $225. They were: A. G. Twy– cross, Susan Sawyer, Mary Walker, Hannah Andrews, Hannah Rea, Betsey Putnam, Ann Brown, Emeline G. White, Elizabeth L. Johnson over three years. No. 2, at Eden street, in a room hired of J. K. Frothingham, is under Miss Mary Walker, who has been longer in this employment than any other of our teachers. No. 3, in the ve
ry, 95. Upper Winter Hill School, 92. Ursiline Community, The, Mt. Benedict, Charlestown, 24. Vacations, 1840-41, 96. Valentine, Elliot, 67. Valentine, J. W., M. D., 49, 73, 74. Varnum, N, . J., 15. Vinal Avenue, 57. Vinal, Anna P., 53. Vinal, Louise A., 53, 55. Vinal, Quincy A., 90, 91. Vinai, Robert, 11. Vinal, Robert A., 91. Vinson, Cornelius M., 93, 96, 97. Wait, Charles, 74. Wait, David, 12. Walker, Cornelius, 17, 18, 19, 20. Walker, Rev., James, 23, 48. Walker, Mary, 17, 72, 82. Walker, Moses W., 50, 51, 52, 67. Walker's Dictionary, 25. Walker Street, 93. Wallis, Andrew, 19. Walnut Hill School, 64. Walnut Street, 53, 55, 90. Walsh, W., 15. Ward, A., 13. Ward, Eliza D., 46. Ward, J., 12. Warren District, 93. Warren, George W., Esq., 49, 73, 76, 92, 94. Warren School, 99. Warren School Dedication, Programme, 94. Warren Street, 81. Warren, Susan Ann, 20. Warren, Susan R., 21. Washington Elm, 1, 5, 6. Washington, George, 6.
835, March 13, David Damon was installed. He died [June 25] 1843. The Churches that took part at Mr. Damon's installation were: First Church in Cambridge; Church in Watertown; Mr. Ripley's in Waltham; Church in Lexington; Church in Medford; Mr. Walker's in Charlestown; Dr. Lowell's in Boston; and the Third Congregational Church in Reading. Dr. Lowell moderator and Mr. Stetson scribe of the Council. Rev. Mr. Stetson made the Introductory Prayer; Rev. Dr. Lowell preached the Sermon; Rev. Mr. Francis offered the Prayer of Installation; Rev. Mr. Ripley gave the Charge; Rev. Mr. Walker the Right Hand; Rev. Mr. Newell made the Concluding Prayer. Rev. Mr. Briggs of Lexington was absent on account of ill health at the time of this installation. To Mr. Damon's time the following persons had been Deacons: John Cutter and John Winship, chosen 1739; Thomas Hall and Joseph Adams, chosen 1769; Ephraim Frost and John Adams, chosen 1792; Ephraim Cutter, chosen before 1828; Miles Gardner, ch
814, State Senator 1840; an honored citizen, a faithful lawyer, and upright man. Harriet, his wid., d. 2 Aug. 1866, a. 67 (monument). He m. Harriet Tufts (by Rev. Dr. Walker, Charlestown, 24 May, 1821). No issue. See Wyman, 839, 1068. 27. William Adams, s. of James (18), b. (14 May, 1790),m. Kezia Teel of Chas. 16 June, 1811.. 17 Aug. 1746. Wil-Liam, m. Mary Holmes, of Lexington, 24 Dec. 1746. Waldron, Edward, Jr., of Sterling, m. Martha Estabrook, of Lexington, 23 Sept. 1794. Walker, Nathaniel, of Westmoreland. m. Mrs. Martha Burbeck, of Camb., 2 Nov. 1805. Mary, m. Thaddeus Winship, of Lexington, 28 Jan. 1818. Olive A., m. Mark Alcutt, ofah, m. Leonard Johnson, of W. Camb., 2 Apr. 1812. Sally, m. John Frost, of W. Camb., 1 Aug. 1813. Emily, m. Otis Reed, of Boston, 13 Nov. 1817. Thad-Deus, m. Mary Walker, of Lexington, 28 Jan. 1818. Anna, m. Erastus Brown, of Lexington, 22 Oct. 1826. Hannah, of Dorchester, m. John Boutell, of Charlestown, 21 Oct. 1812. Wisw
72, 277, 281, 282, 286,288, 295-97, 302-04, 307, 310-12, 320, 321, 349 Tukey, 343 Turell, 24, 25, 30, 33 Turner, 145, 189,312, 339 Tuttle, 301, 307, 312 Twaddle, 249, 312 Tynan, 345 Underwood, 172,299,312, 328 Usher, 296 Vaughan, 14 Verry, 220 Victorine, 347 Vila, 243, 312 Viles, 238, 308, 312 Vinton, 251 Wade, 14, 202 Wainwright, 257, 312 Wait and Waitt, 219,261, 312 Wakefield, 262, 312 Waldo, 154,172, 177, 228 Waldron, 237, 312 Walker, 119, 178, 189, 199, 297, 313, 330 Wallis, 67, 70 Walton, 270, 272, 273, 313 Ward, 343 Ware, 120, 172, 174, 226 Warland, 20, 286, 313 Warner, 164 Warren, 65, 83, 100. 112, 143, 144, 145, 167-69, 175, 194, 231, 247, 266, 276, 285, 298, 299, 306, 313, 317, 339 Warrior (Negro). 313 Warrow (or Worrow), 313 Washington, 83, 99, 10 8, 157, 162, 185, 225, 231, 270 Watson, 19, 59, 79, 83, 95, 107, 110, 199, 210, 269, 300, 304, 313, 331 Watts, 239, 304, 314 Webb,
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