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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1853. (search)
e way which seems to promise success. Among the privileges which he enjoyed in college, that which he valued most highly was the instruction received, in lectures and recitations, on the Evidences of Natural and Revealed Religion, from the Rev. Dr. Walker. Not less did he value the pulpit ministrations of this distinguished preacher. His diary at this period, and while he was in the Law School, is filled with abstracts of the sermons to which it was his privilege to listen. The following extract from his journal indicates the influence which these teachings exerted upon his character:— Sunday, January 4, 1852.—Heard Dr. Walker preach from the text, Ecclesiastes VIII. II, Because sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set on them to do evil. After a long abstract of the sermon, he writes:— . . . . This is the sermon on which I may well found the first resolutions and actions of the opening year. Al<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1857. (search)
and action; his lofty notions of right and honor, and other traits of mind and heart which made him so true a man. I can say of him, that I not only loved him, but, although he was a mere boy when I was connected with him, that I truly respected him. He left Mr. Bradford's school to enter Harvard College in the year 1853. He had passed a brilliant examination, and gave every promise of taking high rank in his Class. It was said of him by the distinguished President of the University, Dr. Walker, that, as easily as he could put forth his hand, he could take the highest honors of the Class, if he applied himself to that object. Although he allowed himself to be diverted from it, and failed to accomplish what had been hoped for him as to college rank, he succeeded in awakening a strong interest in his instructors; and among his Class he was an object of enthusiastic regard. After his death, besides passing the customary resolutions expressive of their sorrow at his loss, they addr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1858. (search)
and sighed to be in Cambridge, studying law and reading Plautus. His year at Utica ended, Patten obtained a situation as private tutor, through the aid of President Walker of Harvard University, who had always been his friend. His pupil, George Appleton, a youth of eighteen, was a grandson of William Appleton of Boston, and so— in Hospital at Annapolis, July 5, 1862. dear—— , —I write to you sad news, for I know not how to write directly to the——. I telegraphed to-day to Dr. Walker, but very briefly. Jimmy [Lowell] was mortally wounded, in just the same way as Putnam, only more severely, in the fight last Monday afternoon. When I came in y inch a soldier. From Kingston the body of Major Patten was sent to Cambridge, and there buried with impressive ceremonies, with services conducted by the Rev. Presidents Walker and Hill, and the Rev. Dr. Peabody. The solemn procession of the officers and students of the University, the personal friends and admirers of the
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1859. (search)
im, was practical. Mr. Clarke summed it up in a few words, as a simple honest purpose to do right and be right. He was a thorough man, fresh and natural, made for the innocent enjoyment of this life and to make others enjoy it. He loved to do, and knew how to do, little kindnesses. He lived in the life around him, and not in the clouds. He had strong dislikes as well as affections, and was not above a good honest prejudice. After graduating in 1859, he became partner in the house of Walker, Wise, & Co., booksellers and publishers in Boston. When war threatened, he with his brother William joined the Cadets, in order to prepare themselves to do their part, and were with them when they garrisoned Fort Warren in the spring of 1862. He felt the disasters on the Peninsula as a call to battle, and he helped to raise Company B of the Fortyfifth, or Cadet, Regiment, and went through the Newbern campaign as its First Sergeant, his brother William being First Lieutenant in the same c
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Appendix. (search)
fe Sketch of a New England Clergyman and Army Chaplain. By Richard F. Fuller. I must do something for my country. Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. Boston: Walker, Wise, and Company, 245 Washington Street. 1864. 12mo. pp. 342. Goodwin (H. U. 1854). The Recompense, a Sermon for Country and Kindred, delivered in the Wep. 21. Lowell, J. J. (H. U. 1858). The Remission by Blood. A Tribute to our Soldiers and the Sword, delivered in the West Church, by C. A. Bartol. Boston: Walker, Wise, and Company, 245 Washington Street. 1862. 8vo. pp. 20. Mudge (H. U. 1860). In Memoriam. Charles Redington Mudge, Lieut.-Col. Second Mass. Infantry,ard (H. U. 1852). The Nation's Hour. A Tribute to Major Sidney Willard, delivered in the West Church, December 21, Forefathers' Day, by C. A. Bartol. Boston: Walker, Wise, and Company, 245 Washington Street. 1862. 8vo. pp. 58. The Editor has also been much indebted to the successive pamphlet reports of the Classes of 854,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
rth, James, I. 1, 2;. Wadsworth, J. S., Brig.-Gen., Memoir, I. 1-20. Also, I. 111. Wadsworth, Joseph, I. 1. Wadsworth, William, I. 2, 3;. Walcott Family, I. 3. Walcott, Samuel B., I. 20. Walcott, W. H., Capt., II. 407, 408;. Walker, James, Rev. Dr., L 254, 359, 417, 424. Walker, Wise, & Co., II. 13. Ward, Brig.-Gen., I. 17. Ward, N., Dr., I. 67, 69;. Ware, Helen, I. 221. Ware, John, Dr., I. 221. Ware, Robert, Surgeon, Memoir, I. 221-234. Also, II. 200. Walker, Wise, & Co., II. 13. Ward, Brig.-Gen., I. 17. Ward, N., Dr., I. 67, 69;. Ware, Helen, I. 221. Ware, John, Dr., I. 221. Ware, Robert, Surgeon, Memoir, I. 221-234. Also, II. 200. Warren, G. K., Maj.-Gen., I. 428. Warren, J. M., Dr., II. 435. Washington, George, I. 128. Washington, George (Rebel service), II. 434. Wasson, D. A., Rev., I. 188. Webster, Daniel, Hon., I. 3, 20;,21, 23, 62,154. Webster, Fletcher, Col., Memoir, I. 20-28. Also, II. 50, 219;, 221. Webster, Grace, I. 20. Webster, Julia, I. 25. Weems, H. L., I. 128. Weiss, John. Rev., I. 40. Weitzel, G., Maj.-Gen., I. 66. Weld, S. M., I. 132, 327;. Wells, G. D., Colonel, I