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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 62 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Appendix D: the struggle for pay. (search)
e sense of wrong, the taunts of those who had refused to enlist from the fear of being cheated, and the doubt how much farther the cheat might be carried, the poor fellows were goaded to the utmost. In the Third South Carolina regiment, Sergeant William Walker was shot, by order of court-martial, for leading his company to stack arms before their captain's tent, on the avowed ground that they were released from duty by the refusal of the Government to fulfil its share of the contract. The fearepudiation has at last been officially adopted. There is no alternative for the officers of South Carolina regiments but to wait for another session of Congress, and meanwhile, if necessary, act as executioners for those soldiers who, like Sergeant Walker, refuse to fulfil their share of a contract where the Government has openly repudiated the other share. If a year's discussion, however, has at length secured the arrears of pay for the Northern colored regiments, possibly two years may sec
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
,115, 168, 169, 172, 174, 175, 182, 237,243, 247, 258, 261, 265, 269, 270, 272, 274, 276, 286,292, 294, 9, 62, Trowbridge, J. A., Lt., 271. Tubman, Harriet, 11. 272. Twichell, J. F., Lt.-Col. 117, 122. ,270. Vendross, Robert, Corp., 265. 28. Walker, G. D., Capt., 270. Walker, William, Sergt., 280, 289. Washington, William, 21. 271. Watson, Lt., 100. Webster, Daniel, IHon., 1. 16, 34, Weld, S. M., 225. 1, 64, West, H. C., Lt., 271. 226, West, J. B., Lt., 271. 8 273, White, E. P., Lt.,Walker, William, Sergt., 280, 289. Washington, William, 21. 271. Watson, Lt., 100. Webster, Daniel, IHon., 1. 16, 34, Weld, S. M., 225. 1, 64, West, H. C., Lt., 271. 226, West, J. B., Lt., 271. 8 273, White, E. P., Lt., 271. White, N, S., Capt., 270, 271, 272. Whiting, William, Hon., 282, 284,288, 290. Whitney, H. A., Maj., 176, 230, 269, 270. Wiggins, Cyrus, 266. Williams, Harry Sergt., 230. , 277, Williams, Col., 277. Wilson, Henry, Hon., 281, 284, 285. Wilson family, 246. Wood, H., Lt., 271, 272. Wood, W. J., Maj. 280. Wright, Gen., 98, 104. Wright, Fanny, 247. Zachos, Dr., 18. the end. Cambridge: Electrotyped and Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
rs, Henry Straudt, John E. Noack, and Philip Andermann; Confidential Mail and Market Man, Peter Hart. Privates.--Patrick Murphy, Tedeschi Onoratto, Peter Rice, Henry Schmidt, John Urquhart, Andrew Wickstrom, Edward Brady, Barney Cain, John Doran, Dennis Johnson, John Kehoe, John Klein, John Lanagan, John Laroche, Deserted on the 22d of April, 1861. Frederick Lintner, John Magill, Frederick Meier, James Moore, William Morter, Patrick Neilan, John Nixon, Michael O'Donald, Robert Roe, William Walker, Joseph Wall, Edmund Walsh, Henry R. Walter, Herman Will, Thomas Wishnowski, Casper Wutterpel, Cornelius Baker, Thomas Carroll, Patrick Clancy, John Davis, James Digdam, George Fielding, Edward Gallway, James Gibbons, James Hays, Daniel Hough, John Irwin, James McDonald, Samuel Miller, John Newport, George Pinchard, Frank Rivers, Lewis Schroeder, Carl A. Sellman, John Thompson, Charles H. Tozer, William Witzmann. All of the officers but three were highly promoted during the war. Major
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), William the Conqueror. (search)
abilities of the curliest serpentine order. We have said many things sharp and severe of Mr. William Walker, the distinguished pirate. If our memory serves us, we have held him up to the public as thought that if it were right to hang anybody, it would be eminently fit and proper to hang William Walker. We beg pardon of our readers for this mistake. We have not understood William. We havere it had been abolished. The Republic of Nicaragua, according to William, is the Republic of Walker. Although the last vestige of his authority has disappeared in that State--although he is neithecretary of State? Nothing strikes us more forcibly than the eminent consideration with which Walker regards the Neutrality Laws of this country. He, the exiled Nicaraguan, is the guest of the Uniieves that they intend to purloin upon quite legal and Christian principles. The crime of which Walker professes such an abhorrence, he committed, as all the world knows, in 1853. And he will commit
151 Russell, William H158, 187 Repudiation of Northern Debts162 Red Bill, a New Orleans Patriarch318 Romilly, Sir Samuel828 Robertson, Dr., on Slavery803 Screws, Benjamin, Negro Broker8, 88 Society for Promoting National Unity186 Stevens, Alexander H148 Secession, The Ordinance of178 Slidell, Miss204 Secessionists, The Dissensions of219 St. Domingo, The Argument from326 Saulsbury, Senator334, 351 Tyler, John, his Diagnosis128 Times, The London158, 177, 309, 366, 374 Toombs, General, his Trials269 Thirty-Five, The Council of273 Taliaferro, Mr., his Defalcation316 Thugs in New Orleans318 University, a Southern Wanted61 Utopia, A. Slaveholding300 Van Buren, John44 Virginia, Democracy in185 Wise, Henry A.2, 95, 135, 155 Walker, William, his Letter to General Cass33, 35 Winslow, Hubbard136 Williams, Commander206 Winthrop, Robert C.248 Wood, Benjamin379, 383 Yeadon, Richard8 Young, Brigham358, 392
nt for us, under the power expressly given to make needful rules and regulations--to have established the principle now proposed; yet the question assumes a totally different aspect when that principle is intended to apply to a State.--Benton's Abridgment. N. Y., 1858., vol. VI., p. 341. of Virginia. But this admission, however generally made, did not gain a single Southern vote for the policy of Restriction when the bill to organize Arkansas Territory was under consideration; where — on Mr. Walker, of North Carolina, in opposing that policy, gravely, and without the least suspicion of irony, observed: Let it not be forgotten that we are legislating in a free country, and for a free people. But the champions of Restriction, though less agile and skillful of fence than their opponents, were by no means worsted in the argument. Here is a specimen of their logic, from the speech of John W. Taylor: February 15, 1819. Gentlemen have said the amendment is in violation of the treat
receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or may hereafter be presented to this House, praying for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia, and also the resolutions offered by an honorable member from Maine (Mr. Jarvis), with the amendment thereto, proposed by an honorable member from Virginia (Mr. Wise), and every other paper or propositi
assent to be unnecessary. VII. Other details of the annexation to be adjusted by treaty, so far as the same may come within the scope of the treaty-making power. This was rejected by 11 Yeas — all Whigs from Free States--to 33 Nays. Mr. Walker,of Wisconsin, moved to add to the House proposition an alternative contemplating negotiation as a means of effecting the end proposed: and this was carried by 27 Yeas, to 25 Nays — the Nays all Whigs. The measure, as thus amended, passed the Sthose of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps,<
organizing the new Territories with no restriction on or impediment to the introduction of Slavery, calculating that a sufficient number of the Northern friends of the Administration would permit this to pass rather than see the Government crippled and the President constrained to call an extra session of Congress — always a portent of evil to the party in power. Accordingly, the great Appropriation bill having passed the House, and been reported to and several days debated in the Senate, Mr. Walker, of Wisconsin, moved to add a section extending the laws of the United States over the territory west of the Rio del Norte, acquired from Mexico by the treaty of February 22, 1848, and authorizing the President to prescribe and establish all proper and needful regulations for the enforcement of the Constitution and laws in said Territory; as also to appoint and commission such officers as may be necessary to administer such laws, etc., etc. This passed the Senate by 29 Yeas Including on
. Cass, the inventor of Popular Sovereignty, who was in his seat and voted just before, did not respond to the call of his name on this occasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Pratt, of Maryland; Badger, of North Carolina; Butler and Evans, of South Carolina; Dawson, of Georgia; Fitzpatrick and C. C. Clay, of Alabama; Adams and Brown, of Mississippi; Benjamin and Slidell, oabove mentioned, was disagreed to--22 to 20--and the bill engrossed for its third reading by 29 to 12--and, at a late hour of the night March 3d.--or rather, morning — passed: Yeas 37; Nays Messrs. Bell, of Tennessee, Houston, of Texas, and Walker, of Wisconsin, who had voted against Mr. Chase's amendment above cited, and Mr. James, of Rhode Island, who had not voted on it at all, now voted Nay. Messrs. Bayard, of Delaware, Cass, of Michigan, Thompson, of Kentucky, Geyer, of Missouri, Thom
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