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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for James A. Walker or search for James A. Walker in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
ced to any reliable source it was considered a camp story. At two o'clock we moved up to what was thought to be a bloody morning's work. At the Beacon House a halt was ordered. After waiting some time we were joined by General Terry, who announced that the fort had been evacuated between nine and ten the night before, and that we were marching to a bloodless victory. The enemy retired by way of Cumming's Point in boats, a few of them only falling into the hands of our boat infantry. Captain Walker, of the New York Volunteer Engineers, pulled up some of the pallisading around the fort about ten o'clock, most likely while the evacuation was going on. The first man to enter the work was a sergeant of the Thirty-ninth Illinois, who is said to have volunteered to go in alone to see if the enemy had gone. Upon his return a few troops entered and took undisputed possession. The announcement that the enemy had left was received with satisfaction. Three thousand hearts beat happier.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
st sad day at Petersburg, with a sick furlough in his pocket, yielded up his noble life in an attempt to restore his broken lines. Our lieutenant colonel was James A. Walker, who won his wreath and stars by cool courage and notable skill; who was the last commander of the old Stonewall Brigade; who led Early's old division to Appoe, some commotion in that part of the congregation; but quiet was soon restored, and the chaplain announced his text, and was proceeding with his sermon, when Colonel Walker informed him that, if he would suspend the service, he would move the brigade back under shelter of the hill. Accordingly, the command was moved back (a memburtesy and respect. I can testify that, in constant intercourse with our officers, from Generals Lee, Jackson, Ewell, Stuart, A. P. Hill, Early, J. B. Gordon, J. A. Walker, and others of highest rank down to the lowest rank, I was never treated otherwise than with marked courtesy, kindness, and respect, and I usually found them r
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
r of McClellan's forces from the Lower James to the Potomac, and at once set the remainder of his army in motion for the Rappahannock-hoping to overwhelm Pope while the bulk of his reinforcements were yet en route. Leaving McLaws, D. H. Hill, and Walker in front of Richmond, General Lee joined Jackson with the divisions of Longstreet, Jones, Hood, and R. H. Anderson on the 19th of August, and on the same day Pope, in the meantime strengthened by Reno's corps, of Burnside's army, commenced a fullline. For several hours Jackson sustained this attack, but at length his men were pressed back, and Early and Hood were left alone to maintain that flank of the army. At this critical juncture General McLaws came on the field, and, aided by General Walker, who had been hurriedly withdrawn from the right, succeeded in re-establishing affairs, and pushing the enemy back to his original position. In the meantime, the centre was also heavily pressed, and D. H. Hill was fully employed in guarding