Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Leroy P. Walker or search for Leroy P. Walker in all documents.

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he stone bridge. It is with pride and pleasure that I refer to the coolness and gallantry of the whole command during the day. The fire upon the enemy was well-directed and destructive, and they sustained his fire with the indifference of veteran troops. The Maryland regiment was under Lieut.-Col. G. H. Steuart and Major Bradley T. Johnson; the 3d Tennessee under Col. Vaughan, Lieut.-Col. Reese, and Major Morgan, and the 10th Virginia regiment under Col. Gibbons, Lieut.-Col. Warren, and Major Walker. I cannot speak too highly of the gallantry and good service of my personal staff, Lieutenants Chentney, McDonald, and Contee. They were repeatedly exposed to the enemy's fire in delivering orders, and rendered excellent service in obtaining information of his whereabouts. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Arnold Elzey, Brigadier-General Commanding 4th Brigade. To Major Thomas G. Rhett, Ass't Adj't-Gen. Report of Capt. John D. Imboden, of the Stau
Doc. 109.-the Confederate Government. the Executive. President,Jefferson Davis, of Miss. Vice-President,Alex. H. Stephens, of Ga. the Cabinet. Secretary of State,Robert Toombs, Ga. Secretary of Treasury,C. L. Memminger, S. C. Secretary of War,Leroy P. Walker, Ala. Secretary of the Navy,Stephen R. Mallory, Fla. Postmaster-General,John H. Reagan, Texas. Attorney-General,Judah P. Benjamin, La. members of Congress. Virginia.  James A. Seddon.  W. Ballard Preston. 1.R. M. T. Hunter. 2.John Tyler. 3.W. H. Macfarland. 4.Roger A. Pryor. 5.Thomas S. Bocock. 6.Wm. S. Rives. 7.Robert E. Scott. 8.James M. Mason. 9.J. Brockenbrough. 10.Chas. W. Russell. 11.Robert Johnston. 12.Walter Staples. 13.Walter Preston. North Carolina.  Geo. Davis.  W. W. Avery. 1.W. N. H. Smith. 2.Thomas Ruffin. 3.T. D. McDowell. 4.A. W. Venable. 5.J. M. Morehead. 6.R. C. Puryer. 7.Burton Craige. 8.E. A. Davidson. Alabama. 1.R. W. Walker. 2.R. H. Smith. 3.J. L. M. Curry
rendered, what do we find stated in Montgomery when the news reached there? Here is the telegraphic announcement of the reception of the news there: Montgomery, Friday, April 12, 1861. An immense crowd serenaded President Davis and Secretary Walker, at the Exchange Hotel to-night. Mr. Davis refused to address the audience, but his Secretary of War did. The Secretary of War, Mr. Walker, said: No man could tell where the war this day commenced would end, but he would prophesy tMr. Walker, said: No man could tell where the war this day commenced would end, but he would prophesy that the flag which now flaunts the breeze here would float over the old Capitol, at Washington, before the 1st of May. Let them try Southern chivalry and test the extent of Southern resources, and it might float eventually over Faneuil Hall itself. What is the announcement? We have attacked Fort Sumter and it has surrendered, and no one can tell where this war will end. By the 1st of May our flag will wave in triumph from the dome of the old Capitol at Washington, and ere long perhaps from
their respective forces, rendered valuable service under many disadvantages. I desire, especially, to bring to your notice J. P. Orr, of Paris, Mo., who bore our standard through the heat of the conflict, though badly wounded, and having his colors torn into shreds by the bullets of the enemy. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, John B. Clark, Brigadier-General, Third District M. S. G. Ben. McCulloch's despatch. Springfield, Mo., via little Rock, Ark., Aug. 12. Hon. L. P. Walker: The battle of Oakhill has been fought, and we have gained a great victory over the enemy, commanded by Gen. N. Lyon. The battle was fought ten miles from Springfield. The enemy were nine or ten thousand strong; our force was about the same. The battle lasted six and a half hours. The enemy were repulsed and driven from the field, with the loss of six pieces of artillery, several hundred stands of small-arms, eight hundred killed, one thousand wounded, and three hundred prisoners. G
their respective forces, rendered valuable service under many disadvantages. I desire, especially, to bring to your notice J. P. Orr, of Paris, Mo., who bore our standard through the heat of the conflict, though badly wounded, and having his colors torn into shreds by the bullets of the enemy. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, John B. Clark, Brigadier-General, Third District M. S. G. Ben. McCulloch's despatch. Springfield, Mo., via little Rock, Ark., Aug. 12. Hon. L. P. Walker: The battle of Oakhill has been fought, and we have gained a great victory over the enemy, commanded by Gen. N. Lyon. The battle was fought ten miles from Springfield. The enemy were nine or ten thousand strong; our force was about the same. The battle lasted six and a half hours. The enemy were repulsed and driven from the field, with the loss of six pieces of artillery, several hundred stands of small-arms, eight hundred killed, one thousand wounded, and three hundred prisoners. G