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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lindsey Walker or search for Lindsey Walker in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ent it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referred it to General Johnston. General Johnston's Adjutant, thinking the section had accompanied General Walker's division to Chickamauga, sent the application to General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The GenerGeneral Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been taken from his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was rece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ent it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referred it to General Johnston. General Johnston's Adjutant, thinking the section had accompanied General Walker's division to Chickamauga, sent the application to General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The GenerGeneral Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been taken from his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was rece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
Peavine Church and Rock Spring Church, under orders to cross the West Chickamauga river at Thedford's ford, after Major-General Walker's division had succeeded in crossing below me. Part of my route being common with that of Walker's column, my marcWalker's column, my march was somewhat retarded by the encounter of the two columns, but notwithstanding this I occupied, about 2 P. M., with Stewart's division, after a brisk skirmish, the crossing at Thedford's ford, and with Preston's division, without opposition, the crossing at Hunt's or Dalton's Ford. In this position, holding both banks of the stream, I awaited the movements of Walker on my right. At daylight on the 19th, under instructions from the commanding General, I crossed my entire corps to the west bivision, as I was informed, being directed to sustain me in the proposed advance. About noon, when the enemy's attack on Walker had been met, and Cheatham's division, which had been sent to sustain him, had become hotly engaged, Stewart's division w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
Thomas's corps, about 8,000 men. (General Bragg's letter to me dated February 8th, 1873.) while in the act of passing one of the gaps leading from McLemore's Cove, enclosed between Lookout and Pigeon Mountains to Alpine's, in Broomtown valley, where lay McCook's corps, he was suddenly confronted by a portion of our forces under General Hindman, Hindman's force was composed of his own and Rucker's, 10,922 men, and Martin's cavalry, about 500, besides a force of two divisions—Cleburne's and Walker's—at least 8,000 more, immediately in the enemy's front, with orders to attack as soon as Hindman's guns were heard on the flank and rear. (General Bragg's letter, February 8th.) which compelled his hasty retreat. This sudden show of strength excited uneasiness and doubt in the mind of Rosecrans. He could not decide whether it evinced a purpose to give battle, or a movement to secure a safe retreat. It was not a retreat, but a movement by Bragg to meet the enemy in front whenever he sho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
fringed with laurel and pine, Stuart found massed upon the summit of the hill the whole of the Federal cavalry; it was here he met a most determined resistance. A piece of artillery was placed in position and the road was shelled, but this failed in dislodging the enemy. Stuart, desirous of carrying this point, speedily ordered W. H. F. Lee forward with the Ninth. The third squadron of this regiment was composed of the Essex Light Dragoons, Captain Latane, and the Mercer County Cavalry, L. Walker commanding. Captain Latane charged at the head of the squadron and met the advancing Federals. As the two bodies clashed the Federal commander shouted: Cut and thrust, and the gallant Latane yelled: On to them boys! The Fifth United States Regulars fought splendidly but they could not long resist the Ninth, that struck them like a thunderbolt. In this fight the brave and deeply lamented Captain Latane was killed while charging fifteen paces in advance of his squadron. The writer sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. (search)
n to it We had a great deal of trouble to bring these guns up, for the roads were muddy and our horses almost famished. Saturday, April 8th.—It is impossible for us to reach Lynchburg, the question of our surrender is now one of time only. Marched within four miles of Appomattox Courthouse, and halted about 2 P. M. Later in the afternoon heavy firing is heard immediately in our front, and soon we hear that the enemy have attacked and captured a park of our artillery, commanded by General Lindsey Walker, amounting to some thirty or forty guns. No infantry was supporting this artillery, and though the artillerists made a gallant resistance, yet the most of them had to surrender. Some got off with their guns, and buried them shortly afterwards. The Second Company, Richmond Howitzers, at the evacuation of Richmond, had been given muskets, and have been doing infantry duty ever since. To say that they did their duty well is but to say what we expected of them. At Sailor's Creek,