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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. P. Walker or search for W. P. Walker in all documents.

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ight wing passes through the stronger redoubt, and wheels down to aid its left in the fort nearest the railway, leaving the Fifth Wisconsin to complete the work so well begun in the larger fort. Hand to hand they fight with triple their number. Walker, the senior captain of the Fifth Wisconsin, the scarred hero of a score of battles, has fallen, mortally wounded in the head, between the larger redoubt and the rifle-pit on its left. Gallant Captain Ordway, next on the list, of the same regiment, as he leaps upon the parapet and waves his sword, to stimulate his men, falls dead inside the fort, shot through the heart. Close by Walker lies the stalwart form of the hitherto unhurt Furlong, captain in the Sixth Maine--poor, brave, warm-hearted Furlong! Within the fort, pierced through the body, and with his brains blown out, lies Lieutenant McKinley, of the same regiment. At the foot of the hill, in the road, lies Lieutenant-Colonel Harris, with a shattered hip — Harris, than whom no
lors, two pieces of artillery, upward of five thousand muskets, etc. Of the troops opposed to us were four brigades of Walker's division, Hardee's corps; a portion of Stewart's division, of Breckinridge's corps; and on the top of the mountain wereconfederate officers in command on the mountain. Our forces had been much weakened the night before by the withdrawal of Walker's division, which was sent to the right, leaving only Stevenson's and Cheatham's divisions behind, both under command of ho commanded on the right, while Major-General Breckinridge commanded on the left. Hardee's command embraced Cleburne's, Walker's, (commanded by General Gist, General Walker being absent,) Cheatham's, and Stevenson's divisions. Breckinridge's embraGeneral Walker being absent,) Cheatham's, and Stevenson's divisions. Breckinridge's embraced his old division, commanded by Brigadier-General Lewis, Stewart's, part of Buckner's and Hindman's, commanded by Patton Anderson. The enemy's first assault upon Hardee was repulsed with great slaughter, as was his second, though made with double
with the enemy, who were advancing up the road leading from the Fredericksburgh turnpike to Raccoon Ford, about a mile below Bartley's Mill, in Spotsylvania County, some eighteen miles below Orange Court-House, and some twenty-two miles above Fredericksburgh, and about twelve miles above the Chancellorsville battle-ground. The Louisiana brigade, under General Halford, first became engaged, and afterward the whole division of General E. Johnson, consisting of the Stonewall brigade, under General Walker, General G. H. Stuart's brigade, and General G. M. Jones's brigade, took part in the battle. The force of the enemy engaged consisted of French's and Birney's corps. Skirmishing began about ten o'clock in the morning, and was kept up quite briskly until about three in the evening, when the whole line of this division became engaged, and from this time until night there was quite a severe and brisk fight. During the fight we drove the enemy, who were the attacking party, back full a
seized the gap where the Parkersburgh turnpike crosses the Shenandoah, and prevented a raid on Staunton. Averill left five hundred men to hold Imboden there, and pushed on toward Salem. That General could not pursue without uncovering Staunton, the force threatening nearly equalling his own. General Lee was informed of the situation of affairs. Here commences the reign of Major-Generals and military science. Major-General Tubal A. Early came; Major-General Fitz-Hugh Lee came; Brigadier-General Walker came; Brigadier-General Thomas came; their staffs came. They all took a drink. General Early took two. Brigadier-General Wickham came; Colonel Chambliss, commanding a brigade, came. They smiled also. When Averill was opposite Staunton, Fitz Lee was at Fry Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, a day's march from that town — a fortunate occurrence, indeed. Every body thought Averill was treed now. Lee was ordered across the Blue Ridge. He passed through Brown's Gap, and str
ve already reembarked, and are on the way to Alexandria. Fort De Russy takes its name from Colonel De Russy, who formerly commanded in this vicinity, and lives not far distant. Lieutenant-Colonel Bird was in command, though he reported to General Walker, whose headquarters were at Alexandria. The following officers are prisoners: Captains Stevens, Morran, Wise, Wright, Laird, and King; Lieutenants Denson, Fuller, Fogarty, Claydon, Trumbull, (Eng.,) Burbank, Hewey, Assenheimer, Fall, Hauk,urrendered to forces which marched across the country. Of this sort was the unfinished obstruction of piles about nine miles below here, which the gunboats had to tear away to allow the huge transports to pass through. As nearly as I can learn, Walker has two thousand men, mostly infantry, south of us. Taylor has, perhaps, as many at Alexandria, and it is probable that they may be united at the latter place. Banks has some, doubtless, in his front about Opelousas. The Red River has not bee
nth army corps north to Lauderdale Springs. This grand crossing of the main railroads of the south-west, at Meridian, is crossed out for the war, and the tax in kind will hardly be wagoned out of Mississippi to any great extent. February twentieth, commenced our return march, making sixteen miles. February twenty-first, marched fourteen miles to Decatur. February twenty-second, marched eighteen miles. February twenty-third, marched twelve miles to Hillsboro. Found the graves of Walker (company I) and Griggs, privates of the Thirteenth Iowa, both murdered after being captured, as narrated above. February twenty-fourth, the Iowa brigade marched twenty-three miles in eight hours and a half, to Pearl River, to guard pioneers in building bridges over the river on the Canton road. February twenty-fifth, finished the bridge and crossed to-day. February twenty-sixth, marched thirteen miles to Canton, county-seat of Madison County, remaining four days, the town guarded by
the place. In a few moments, and with small loss, two hundred and fifty prisoners, eight heavy guns, and two field-pieces fell into our hands, and all the munitions of war. The main body of the enemy, five thousand strong, under the rebel General Walker, made their escape. They left the Fort, it was said, to give battle to our troops, and left a garrison of three hundred men to defend it. Our army came in by a different road from what they expected, and made short work of them. Among the ger-battery, and which alone had been attacked. The guns and works were captured uninjured, and one hundred and eighty-five prisoners fell into General Smith's hands, those of the enemy occupying the water-battery making good their escape. General Walker, the rebel commander, had marched out with five thousand men ostensibly to attack our approaching land force, leaving a garrison of but three hundred men to defend works incomplete and of considerable extent, and which, if complete, had been
tion to-morrow, if the rebels see proper to accept the offer of battle; and they may be compelled to fight, whether they like it or not. The fight took place in a densely wooded and uneven country, known as the Piny Woods, and both cavalry and artillery found it difficult to operate. The force opposed to us was composed of the First and Second Louisiana; Fifth, Seventh, and Bray's Texas cavalry; Moreton's brigade; and one battery of artillery, numbering in all about three thousand men. Walker's division was camped here last night, but moved on to Pleasant Hill this morning. The rebels have now all fallen back toward Pleasant Hill, where it is thought they will make a stand. General Lee was on the field, and gave the direction of affairs in a manner that convinced all parties that he knew exactly what was to be done, and how to do it. He seems determined that the laurels won on other fields shall not wither or fade, and that if energy, ability, courage, and constant watchfulne