hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 62 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 6 2 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for William Walker or search for William Walker in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

ustavus Vasa Fox, assistant secretary of the navy. He had spent eighteen years of his life in the navy, but had resigned five years before the war, and had engaged in business. Nominally an assistant secretary, he was practically, as has been said by others, a chief of staff, and the rapidity with which our young navy was organized was largely due to his efforts. Commander (afterwards admiral) Charles Henry Davis, another Massachusetts man, before best known as the captor, in 1857, of William Walker the filibuster, also worked most efficiently, under the direction of the navy department, in boards to report on iron-clads and also on the enemy's coast. In that momentous early success of the war, the capture of Port Royal (Nov. 7, 1861), he was fleet captain, and his promptness in surveying immediately the channel for the larger vessels had much to do with the ultimate success. Flag-Officer Dupont says: By the skill of Commander Davis, the fleet captain, and Mr. Boutelle, the able a