Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 31, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James W. Wall or search for James W. Wall in all documents.

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The sentiment in the United States. speech of Senator Wall--the spirit of the Press — recruiting. The Northern papers received for several weeks past, are gloomier in their vaticination about the war, than they have been since its opening. Each batch is more sombre than the preceding one. To compare the editod out in New Orleans, on the twenty-second of February, a very different and more serious exhibition was taking place in New Jersey, the chief speaker being Hon. James W. Wall, late a United States Senator from that State. The Speaker has but one thing to learn, and that is, that there can be no "reconciliation," in his meaning of the word, between the two nations; and with this explanation we copy some. Extracts from the speech of Senator Wall. The mad fanaticism that now rules the hour would extinguish this fire by feeding it with more fuel. They would pour fire upon the conflagration instead of water. They would save the Union through the ve
--John Nocker was yesterday brought before the Mayor, on the charge of passing a counterfeit Confederate Treasury note on Michael Wall. It appears that Mr. Wall, having taken the note in, in the way of business at his store, had offered to pay it along with other money, to John Smith. Mr. Smith refused to take the note,Nocker, and that he, on its being refused as a counterfeit at the Bank of the Commonwealth, had written Nocker's name on it, and returned it to him. Hearing this Mr. Wall went to Nocker and demanded that he should redeem the note, but Nocker refused, when Wall had him arrested. After the case was brought into Court, however, Nockd that he should redeem the note, but Nocker refused, when Wall had him arrested. After the case was brought into Court, however, Nocker had given Mr. Wall another twenty dollars, and agreed to take the suspected note back. The Mayor sent the note down to the Treasury, and it being their pronounced good, he dismissed the case.