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Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
risoners of war, and is issued as a report of a commission of inquiry appointed by The United States Sanitary Commission. This body is alleged to consist of Valentine Mott, M. D., Edward Delafield, M. D., Gonverneur Morris Wilkins, Esq., Ellerslie Wallace, M. D., Hon. J. J. Clarke Hare, and Rev. Treadwell Walden. Although these persons are not of sufficient public importance and weight to give authority to their publications, yet your committee have deemed it proper to notice it in connectile. Yet amid all these privations we have given to their prisoners the rations above mentioned. It is well known that this quantity of food is sufficient to keep in health a man who does not labor hard. All the learned disquisitions of Dr. Ellerslie Wallace on the subject of starvation might have been spared, for they are all founded on a false basis. It will be observed that few (if any) of the witnesses examined. by the Sanitary Commission speak with any accuracy of the quantity (in weig
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
of two hundred years or more, in what Blackstone declares to be the sum of all wickedness denounced in the Decalogue, namely, treason. Proofs from ten thousand tongues certify and justify the conclusions of a National Senator (Howard), who, while holding in his hand the report of a Committee appointed by the United States Sanitary Commission in May, 1864, This Committee was composed of Doctors Valentine Mott and Edward Delafield, and Gouverneur Morris. Wilkins, of New York, and Doctor Ellerslie Wallace, Hon. John J. Clark Hare, and Rev. Treadwell Walden of Philadelphia. They were appointed by the Commission for ascertaining, by inquiry and investigation, the true physical condition of prisoners recently discharged, by exchange, from confinement at Richmond and elsewhere within the rebel lines; whether they did, in fact, during such confinement, suffer materially for want of food, or from its defective quality, or from other privations or sources of disease; and whether their priv
the murder of Gen. Morgan in East Tennessee. Early's invasion of Maryland. daring of Gen. Lee. what he proposed by sending Early's column into the North. Grant's preparations against this movement. battle of Monocacy Bridge. defeat of Lew Wallace's command. Early advances upon Washington. skirmish in front of Fort Stevens. Early declines to attack the Federal capital and retreats. questions as to the strength of Washington. results of Early's expedition. its effect on the armies opin command of the Federal forces there, retreated across the Potomac at Shephardstown; and Gen. Weber, commanding at Harper's Ferry, crossed the river, and occupied Hagerstown, moving a strong column towards Frederick City. Meanwhile Gen. Lew. Wallace, a commander much akin in character to Beast Butler, and who had distinguished himself in Baltimore by a cowardly ferocity and an easy prowess in the arrest and persecution of citizens, pushed out from that city with Ricketts' division and his o
risoners of war, and is issued as a report of a commission of enquiry appointed by The United States Sanitary Commission. This body is alleged to consist of Valentine Mott, M. D., Edward Delafield, M. D., Gouverneur Morris Wilkins, Esq., Ellerslie Wallace, M. D.,--Ion. J. J. Clarke Hare, and Rev. Treadwell Walden. Although these persons are not of sufficient public importance and weight to give authority to their publication, yet your committee have deemed it proper to notice it in connect. Yet amid all these privations, we have given to their prisoners the rations above mentioned. It is well known that this quantity of food is sufficient to keep in health a man who does not labour hard. All the learned disquisitions of Dr. Ellerslie Wallace on the subject of starvation, might have been spared, for they are all founded on a false basis. It will be observed that few (if any) of the witnesses examined by the Sanitary Commission speak with any accuracy of the quantity (in weigh