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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
e, Col. Archibald L. McDougall; 5th Conn., Col. W. W. Packer; 20th Conn., Lieut.-Col. William B. Wooster; 3d Md., Col. Jos. M. Sudsburg; 123d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. James C. Rogers, Capt. Adolphus H. Tanner; 145th N. Y., Col. E. L. Price; 46th Pa., Col. James L. Selfridge. Second Brigade,Unassigned during progress of battle; afterwards attached to First Division, as Second Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Henry H. Lockwood; 1st Md., Potomac Home Brigade, Col. William P. Maulsby; 1st Md., Eastern Shore, Col. James Wallace; 150th N. Y., Col. John H. Ketcham. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger, Col. Silas Colgrove; 27th Ind., Col. Silas Colgrove, Lieut.-Col. John R. Fesler; 2d Mass., Lieut. Col. Charles R. Mudge, Maj. Charles F. Morse; 13th N. J., Col. Ezra A. Carman; 107th N. Y., Col. Nirom M. Crane; 3d Wis., Col. William Hawley. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John W. Geary:--First Brigade, Col. Charles Candy; 5th Ohio, Col. John H. Patrick; 7th Ohio, Col. William R. Creighton; 29th Ohio, Capt. W
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
s, Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger. First Brigade, Col. Archibald L. McDougall: 5th Conn., Col. Warren W. Packer; 20th Conn., Lieut.-Col. William B. Wooster; 3d Md., Col. Joseph M. Sudsburg; 123d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. James C. Rogers, Capt. Adolphus H. Tanner; 145th N. Y., Col. E. Livingston Price; 46th Pa., Col. James L. Selfridge. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 60; m, 8 = 80. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry H. Lockwood: 1st Md. Potomac Home Brigade, Col. William P. Maulsby; 1st Md. Eastern Shore, Col. James Wallace; 150th N. Y., Col. John H. Ketcham. Brigade loss: k, 35; w, 121; mn, 18 = 174. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. Ruger, Col. Silas Colgrove: 27th Ind., Col. Silas Colgrove, Lieut.-Col. John R. Fesler; 2d Mass., Lieut.-Col. Charles R. Mudge (k), Maj. Charles F. Morse; 13th N. J., Col. Ezra A. Carman; 107th N. Y., Col. Nirom M. Crane; 3d Wis., Col. William Hawley. Brigade loss: k, 49; w, 225; m, 5=279. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John W. Geary. First Brigade, Col. Charles Candy:
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
r, had the satisfaction of receiving the surrender of Fort Donelson. He says: On approaching near enough two white flags were seen flying from the upper fort. * * * I proceeded in a tug, with a white flag flying, and landed at the foot of the hill below the fort. I was met by a Major who handed me his sword, which I declined to receive, thinking it proper to consult with General Grant. I took the Major on board the tug and proceeded up to General Buckner's headquarters, where I found General Wallace. General Grant arrived about half an hour after the fort had surrendered. * * * Commander Dove seemed to have the proper idea on this occasion in declining to claim anything, as the fort properly fell to the Army. As soon as Flag-officer Foote was able he proceeded with the Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. Phelps, and the Cairo, Lieut.-Com. Bryant, on an armed reconnoissance up the river, taking with him Colonel Webster, Chief of General Grant's staff, who, with Lieut.-Com. Phelps, took posses
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ommander, Thomas G. Corbin; Lieutenant-Commander, John Irwin; Lieutenant Alexander S. Mackenzie, Ordnance-Officer; Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston, Flag-Lieutenant; Lieutenants, Lloyd Phenix, John H. Rowland and James P. Robertson; Fleet Surgeon, George Clymer; Assistant Surgeons, Henry F. McSherry and Theoron Woolverton; Paymaster, John S. Cunningham; Chaplain, George W. Dorrance; Acting-Master, Townsend Stiles; Marine Officers: Captain, James Lewis; First-Lieutenant, H. B. Lowry; Ensigns, James Wallace, M. L. Johnson, Philip W. Lowry, La Rue P. Adams and Frederick Pearson; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. A. Duer, W. F. Horton and Joel R. Hinman; Engineers: Chief, Robert W. McCleery, Acting-Second-Assistant, J. B. Hathaway; Third-Assistants, J. S. Green, Thomas Crummey; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. L. Marshall, J. B. Place and J. T. Dennett; Boatswain, Zachariah Whitmarsh; Gunner, Thomas Stewart; Carpenter, Charles Bordman; Sailmaker, G. T. Lozier Iron-clad steamer New Ironsides. Captai
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
differ. forts Wagner and battery Gregg evacuated. the Weehawken grounded. disastrous naval assault on Sumter. great gallantry displayed by boat-crews. Ensign Wallace's report torpedo-boat. attempts to destroy New Ironsides. praise of Dahlgren and officers. the monitors and New Ironsides contrasted. Boynton's criticismshells and 125 solid shot against the exposed face of Sumter, doing much damage. Commander Parker was assisted in this service by Lieutenant E. T. Brower, Ensign James Wallace and Acting-Ensign Owens, who deserve great credit for the work they performed for fifteen hours under a burning sun. Though great efforts were made to rGeorge C. Remey, Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Lieutenant F. J. Higginson, Ensign Charles H. Craven, Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Bunce, Lieutenant E. T. Brower, Ensign James Wallace and Ensign B. H. Porter; also the following officers of the Marine Corps: Captain C. G. McCawley, First-Lieutenant Charles H. Bradford, First-Lieutenant Jo
nd volunteers, deserve great credit for their coolness, skill, and gallantry. The officers commanding these guns are as follows: Lieutenant Lloyd Phoenix, Ensigns James Wallace, Samuel P. Adams, and Frederick Pearson. The conduct of my entire staff, Capt. Lewis J. Lambert, A. A.G.; Captain I. Coryell, A. Q.M.; Lieuts. Ira V. Geby the explosion of a single shell. Lieut. Gettings himself was wounded in the ankle. Three howitzers from the Wabash, under command of Lieut. Phoenix and Ensigns Wallace and Larned, accompanied the land forces, and won a great deal of praise for gallantry and effective firing. Young Wallace was sent by Gen. Terry to cover theWallace was sent by Gen. Terry to cover the retreat from Pocotaligo bridge, which he handsomely accomplished. He had delivered two rounds of grape into the enemy's ranks, when a shower of rifle-balls were sent against him, wounding three of his men and perforating his own clothes. The heroic young fellow was then ordered to retire, which he reluctantly did, after vainly a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaspee, (search)
mation ordering diligent search for the perpetrators of the act. Admiral Montague made endeavors towards the same end, and the home government offered a reward of $5,000 for the leader, with the promise of a pardon if the informer should be an accomplice. Not one of the men betrayed their trusted leader, Abraham Whipple (q. v.), afterwards a commodore in the Continental navy. When, subsequently, the colonists were at war with Great Britain, the act of Captain Whipple was avowed, and Sir James Wallace, in command of a British ship-of-war in Narraganset Bay, wrote as follows to the perpetrator of the act: You, Abraham Whipple, on June 9, 1772, burned his Majesty's vessel, the Gaspee, and I will hang you at the yard-arm. Whipple coolly replied: Sir, always catch your man before you hang him. A ballad was written at the time, containing fifty-eight lines of doggerel verse, which ended as follows: Now, for to find these people out, King George has offered very stout, One thousand
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper's Ferry, (search)
was then charged with the duty of holding Harper's Ferry. General McClellan was throwing Ohio troops into western Virginia, and Gen. Robert Patterson, in command of the Department of Pennsylvania, was rapidly gathering a force at Chambersburg, Pa., under Gen. W. H. Keim. A part of the Confederates at the Ferry were on Maryland Heights, on the left bank of the Potomac, and against these Patterson marched from Chambersburg with about 15,000 men in June, 1861. Just at this moment commenced Wallace's dash on Romney, which frightened Johnston, and he abandoned Harper's Ferry, and moved up the valley to Winchester. Before leaving he destroyed the great bridge of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway at the Ferry with fire and gunpowder. It was 1.000 feet long. Then he spiked the heavy guns that could not be taken away, and encamped a few miles up the valley. Patterson, who was at Hagerstown, Md., pushed on, and on June 16 and 17 about 9,000 of his troops crossed the Potomac by fording it a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hull, William 1753-1825 (search)
, until John C. Calhoun became Secretary of War, when he promptly furnished them. With these General Hull set about writing his vindication, which was contained in a pamphlet of a little more than 300 pages, entitled Memoirs of the campaign of the Northwestern army of the United States. It wrought a great change in the public mind. It was seen that he had been misjudged by his impetuous young officers; that his motives in making the surrender were humane and just, and that his assuming the whole responsibility of the act was heroic in the extreme. To Mr. Wallace, one of his aides, he said, when they parted at Detroit: God bless you, my young friend! You return to your family without a stain; as for myself, I have sacrificed a reputation dearer to me than life; but I have saved the inhabitants of Detroit, and my heart approves the act. To-day the character of Gen. William Hull, purified of unwarranted stains, appears in history, without a blemish in the eye of just appreciation.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kingston, burning of (search)
Kingston, burning of Sir Henry Clinton's success in capturing Forts Clinton and Montgomery emboldened him to send a marauding expedition up the Hudson to make a diversion in favor of Burgoyne, hoping thereby to draw many troops from the army of Gates to defend the exposed country below. Early on the morning after the capture of the forts, Oct. 7, 1777, the boom and chain were severed, and a flying squadron of light armed vessels under Sir James Wallace, bearing the whole of Sir Henry's land force, went up the river to devastate its shores. Sir Henry wrote a despatch to Burgoyne on a piece of tissue-paper, saying, We are here, and nothing between us and Gates, and enclosing it in a small, hollow bullet, elliptical in form, gave it to a messenger to convey to the despairing general. The messenger was arrested in Orange county as a spy. He swallowed the bullet, which an emetic compelled him to disgorge. The message was found and the spy was hanged. The marauding force, meanwhil
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