hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. P. Wallace or search for W. P. Wallace in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
(private,) severely wounded. Abraham Davis, (private,) Thirty--second New-York, ball through waist. E. Chasser, (private,) Co. G, Thirty-second New-York, wounded. Wm. Umphries, (private,) Co. H, Thirty-second New-York, flesh, wound. Edwin Comp, (private,) Co. I, Thirty-second New-York, flesh wound. Joseph Hepstine, (private,) Co. F, Thirty-first New-York, flesh wound. known to be dead.--Capt. Young, Co. D, Thirty-second New-York. Capt. S. H. Brown, Co. C, Thirty-second New-York. Lieut. Wallace, Co. C, Thirty-second New-York. Lieut. Pross, Co. F, Thirty-first New-York. Private Christian Hower, Co. B, Thirty-first New-York. Private William Linsener, Co. F, Thirty-first New-York. Private Philip Strells, Co. F, Thirty-first New-York. Private Henry Urimclaserman, Co. F, Thirty-first New-York. Private John J. M. McClernan, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania. Private C. Lebuy, Co. I, Sixteenth New-York. wounded.--Capt. J. H. Boltis, Ninety--fifth Pennsylvania; Sergt. P. S. Devitt, Thirty-
He is a brave gentleman and a loyal officer. He has always been conspicuous in this squadron for acting his part in the best spirit of the profession. In the attack on the batteries at St. Charles he occupied the leading place, and received his wounds at the head of the line, in the zealous performance of his whole duty. Although himself wounded and helpless, he attended to the wants and comforts of his injured officers and men. I have gratefully to acknowledge our obligations to Major-Gen. Wallace and to Dr. Jessup, of the Twenty-fourth Indiana, and to Dr. McClellan, of the First Nebraska regiment, for their valuable assistance. Sister Angela, the Superior of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, (some of whom are performing their offices of mercy at the Mound City Hospital,) has kindly offered the services of the Sisters for the hospital-boat of this squadron when needed. I have written to Com. Pennock to make arrangements for their coming. I have the honor to be, very respectf
arrival of Brigadier-General Hood. The regiment of the enemy taken was larger at least by one hundred men (at the time of its capture) than mine. Throughout the action my officers and men, without exception, conducted themselves in a manner satisfactory, fully sustaining the name and character of the Texas soldiers. When all behaved so well, distinction cannot be made. My color-bearer was shot down and the colors immediately raised by Captain Brantley, of company D, of the colorguard. In the list of casualties I have to report thirteen killed, among them Lieutenant J. E. Clute, company A, who was in command of his company, and fell while leading it to victory; also fifty-nine wounded, among them Captain T. T. Clay, company I, and Lieutenant Wallace, both of them at the head of their companies when wounded, and thirteen missing. For particulars see Adjutant's report already sent in. Respectfully submitted. J. B. Robertson, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Fifth Texas Volunteers.
d upon Lieut.-Col. Goodwin, a young officer of great promise. The conduct of this brigade (Preston's) was preeminently noble, and I regret that its General could not have been present to have shared its perils and enjoyed its constant succession of triumphs. Unfortunately he is confined to his bed with typhoid fever, at the residence of a friend, near Clinton, Miss. Colonel Thompson, however, as Acting Brigadier, proved a gallant and intrepid commander. Of the members of his staff, Capt. W. P. Wallace, aid-de-camp, was wounded early in the action, having his ribs broken; and Lieut. Charles Semple, ordnance-officer, was shot with grape through the leg, being this heroic officer's second wound in the war, the first having been received at Fort Donelson. Major J. R. Throckmorten, Brigade-Quartermaster, rendered invaluable services in removing the wounded. He courted dangerous positions, and captured a lot of Government horses and mules. But this was nothing for a man who had been un
as rapid in noting premonitions of danger in the present encampment as he was in the famous retrograde movement on the battery, he will discover, by the diagnosis, that the atmosphere in that vicinage is breathed by too many of the ill-fated Ninety-fifth men to make respiration pleasant. The Colonel's ill-starred anxiety for distinction, which caused him to importune the authorities for leave to take his regiment to the field; the same manifestation at Lexington, Kentucky, resulting in Gen. Wallace's order to move forward to meet the enemy at Richmond, when not one half the men knew their field-officers, and company-officers hardly knew each other by sight, and the regiment had never had battalion drill; the inhumanity to the sick — the brutality to the well — such as knocking men down with his fist, striking them with his sword, drawing pistols on them, and coming it à la Nelson over them generally, winding up by arresting the whole Quartermaster's Department at once; and, the morn
as rapid in noting premonitions of danger in the present encampment as he was in the famous retrograde movement on the battery, he will discover, by the diagnosis, that the atmosphere in that vicinage is breathed by too many of the ill-fated Ninety-fifth men to make respiration pleasant. The Colonel's ill-starred anxiety for distinction, which caused him to importune the authorities for leave to take his regiment to the field; the same manifestation at Lexington, Kentucky, resulting in Gen. Wallace's order to move forward to meet the enemy at Richmond, when not one half the men knew their field-officers, and company-officers hardly knew each other by sight, and the regiment had never had battalion drill; the inhumanity to the sick — the brutality to the well — such as knocking men down with his fist, striking them with his sword, drawing pistols on them, and coming it à la Nelson over them generally, winding up by arresting the whole Quartermaster's Department at once; and, the morn