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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Watson Wallace or search for James Watson Wallace in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. (search)
Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. Report of General Early.Leesburg, July 14, 1864. General,--After driving Sigel's whole force, of several thousand men, to Maryland Heights and demonstrating against him I moved, on the 8th, around his force, through Boonsboroa, Fox's and Crampton Gaps, and entered Frederick City on the morning of the 9th, driving the enemy's cavalry through the city. I found Wallace in force at Monocacy Junction, his force being stated in northern accounts at 10,000, and consisting, in part, of the Third division of the Sixth corps, under Ricketts, which had arrived the day before. This force we attacked on the afternoon of the same day, Ramseur demonstrating in front, while Gordon moved across the Monocacy, on the enemy's flank, by a route which had been opened by McCausland's brigade of cavalry in a very gallant manner. The enemy in a very short time was completely routed by Gordon, and left the field in great dis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The advance on Washington in 1864. (search)
e the Sixth Corps was taken from the armies operating against Richmond, to which was added the Nineteenth Corps, then fortunately beginning to arrive in Hampton Roads from the the Gulf Department under orders issued immediately after the ascertainment of the result of the Red River Expedition. After describing the garrisons in Baltimore and Washington and my movement across the Potomac, he proceeds: On the 6th the enemy occupied Hagerstown, moving a strong column toward Frederick City. General Wallace, with Ricketts's division and his own command, the latter mostly new and undisciplined troops, pushed out from Baltimore with great promptness and met the enemy in force on the Monocacy, near the crossing of the railroad bridge. His force was not sufficient to insure success, but he fought the enemy nevertheless, and although it resulted in a defeat to our arms, yet it detained the enemy, and thereby served to enable General Wright to reach Washington with two divisions of the Sixth Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
sts of Almighty God, doth depose and say: That having read the evidence or testimony of one Sanford Conover, alias James Watson Wallace, as reported in the public papers to have been given by him, and taken before the Military Commission, now sitting at Washington, D. C., in which he declares that, with others named by said Conover, alias Wallace, he wasi ntimately acquainted with me. This I swear to be absolutely false and untrue. Further, I declare never to have seen this person to my knowlessumed name, before my attention was drawn to it by his testimony. I did not know that such a person as said Conover or Wallace existed. Dr. Pallen, a distinguished surgeon of St. Louis, swears that he never saw or spoke to Sandford Conover, alias James Watson Wallace. Conover said, in his secret testimony, that he did not go by the name of Sandford Conover in Canada, but under the name of James Watson Wallace. The first known of him in Canada was in the latter part of February, 1865, w