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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 20 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 8 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865. You can also browse the collection for Walthall or search for Walthall in all documents.

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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
wild-goose chase towards Atlanta were aboard, and we also found Mrs. Walthall, going to Washington to visit Gen. Toombs's family, and Mrs. Pak, he said, if it was too crowded. Mett and I then got in, and Mrs. Walthall climbed in after us. I felt rather ashamed of myself for all thve said about the old governor, but I couldn't help laughing at Mrs. Walthall, who overwhelmed him with gracious speeches, and then, the minus I liked best, were Mrs. Young and Dr. Morrow, from Marietta. Mrs. Walthall introduced us to her escort, Col. Lockett, an old bachelor, buthters and they were to start at once. After the Toombses left, Mrs. Walthall asked Mett and me to share her room, as she was afraid to stay saw the Georgia cadets on dress parade in front of the capitol. Mrs. Walthall and Col. Lockett joined us there, with several gentlemen that we Simpsons again, and Col. Lockett, who had secured lodging for Mrs. Walthall at a private house, advised us to go on to Culver's, where we h
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, V. In the dust and ashes of defeat (may 6-June 1, 1865). (search)
ffered the Yankees to see them shed a tear, though both are ready to die of grief, and Mrs. DuBose on the verge of her confinement, too. Everything is moved out of the house now, and Mrs. Toombs says she hopes it will be burned rather than used by the miserable plunderers and their negro companions. The family have found shelter with their relatives and distributed their valuables among their friends. The family pictures and some of the plate are stored in our house, and mother invited Mrs. Walthall here, but she went to the Anthonys', knowing how crowded we are. Cora staid with them till late in the afternoon, when the news of Henry's arrival brought her home. I hope the general will get off safe, and Gov. Brown too, though I never admired him. But when people are in misfortune is no time to be bringing up their faults against them. The most infamous thing I ever heard of even a Yankee doing, was their trying to entrap Gen. Toombs's little grand-children into betraying him, a