hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 20 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 8 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Walthall or search for Walthall in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

dly cut up. Hereupon, Walker in turn sent up Liddell's division, making the odds against us two to one; when Baird was in turn driven: the Rebels, charging through the lines of the 14th, 16th, and 18th U. S. regulars, taking two batteries; while Walthall's Georgia brigade captured the 5th regulars, 411 strong, and Govan's, charging by its side, took 100 more prisoners. One of the batteries here lost was the 1st Michigan, formerly Loomis's; regarded by the whole army with pride, and by those w the left, to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout mountain, between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault, and was met by one brigade only, Walthall's, which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground. Why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field, Maj.-Gen. Stevenson, had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his u
the fleeing enemy of course burned the bridges after crossing them; Thomas's pontoon train was away with Sherman; and the roads were hardly passable in the rear of the fleeing foe. Thus the Harpeth, Rutherford's creek, and Duck river, were crossed; the weather at length changing from dreary, pelting rain to bitter cold; Forrest — who had been absent on a raid when our army pushed out from the defenses of Nashville-rejoining Hood at Columbia, and forming a rear-guard of 4,000 infantry under Walthall, and all his cavalry that was still effective. With this, after leaving Pulaski, Dec. 25. he turned sharply on our leading brigade of cavalry (Harrison's) and captured a gun, which was carried off, though the ground on which it was lost was almost instantly recovered. The pursuit was continued to Lexington, Dec. 28. Ala.; when, learning that Hood had got across the Tennessee at Bainbridge, Thomas ordered a halt; Gen. Steedman having already been sent from Franklin across to Murfrees
, killed at Galveston, 324. Waite, Col. C. A., captured at San Antonio, 18. Walker, Gen. W. H. T., at Antietam. 207; defeated at Jackson, 306; at Chickamauga. 415; fights Brannan at Pocotaligo, 463; retreats up Red river before Gen. A. J. Smith, 537; killed at Decatur, Ga., 633. Walker, Capt. (Navy), up the Yazoo river, 318. Wallace, Gen. Lew., 49; at Pittsburg Landing, 59-71; defeated at the Monocacy, 603. Wallace, Gen. W. H. L., 59; 63; killed at Pittsburg Landing, 64. Walthall, Gen., at Chickamauga, 417. War and its causes, Franklin Pierce on, 497. Ward, Gen. Hobart, at Chancellorsville, 360; at Manassas Gap fight, 393. Waring, Col. Geo. E., defeats Marmaduke at Batesville, 447; at Guntown. Miss., 621. Warner, Gen., fights at Henderson's Hill, La., 537. Warren, Gen. Fitz Henry, reenforces Banks on Red river, 550. Warren, Gen. George S., at Gaines's Mill, 156; Malvern Hill, 165; Antietain, 208; Chancellorsville, 356; Centerville, 395; commands th