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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 20 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 18 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 8 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Walthall or search for Walthall in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of Chickamauga, at the same time displaying a heavy force in our immediate front. After visiting the right, and making dispositions there for the new development in that direction, I returned towards the left, to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain, between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault and was met by one brigade only, Walthall's, which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground; why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field, Major-General Stevenson, had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his urgent appeal, another brigade was dispatched in the afternoon to his support—though it appeared his own forces had not been brought into action, and I proceeded to the scene. Arriving just before sunset, I found that we had lost all the advantage
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of Chickamauga, at the same time displaying a heavy force in our immediate front. After visiting the right, and making dispositions there for the new development in that direction, I returned towards the left, to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain, between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault and was met by one brigade only, Walthall's, which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground; why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field, Major-General Stevenson, had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his urgent appeal, another brigade was dispatched in the afternoon to his support—though it appeared his own forces had not been brought into action, and I proceeded to the scene. Arriving just before sunset, I found that we had lost all the advantage
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
llowing morning drove in the enemy's pickets, and forming line of battle, with Walthall's regiment (29th Mississippi) on his right, and Smith's (10th Mississippi regienchments and earthworks. For awhile the attack promised to prove a success. Walthall had reached the wide and deep ditch around Fort Craig, and was in the act of btly opened fire from an eminence about 500 yards distant, throwing shell among Walthall's men and caused them to retire. The 10th Mississippi regiment had reached a y (K), was placed in command of Fort Craig, their extreme left fort, and where Walthall had so gallantly assaulted three days previously. In the engagement of the commission in the line and accepted that of Assistant Adjutant General on General Walthall's (just promoted) staff, who at this juncture was on sick leave in Virginis brave and eloquent Roger Hanson was mortally wounded and soon after died. Walthall's brigade (commanded by Patton Anderson) was ordered to double-quick a distanc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
on. Battle of Chickamauga: On the evening of the 18th September General Pegram, of cavalry, having reported the enemy in force at the river (Chickamauga), Walthall's brigade, which was leading the advance, was formed in line of battle and ordered to advance and take possession of the bridge and ford, which was done; the enes, which Longstreet had permitted to obtain a lodgment on Lookout Mountain. they had reached midway the mountains, when the ever-watchful, gallant, and chivalric Walthall, who with his brigade was stationed at the point, observed them and commenced to give them battle. Failing to obtain from General J. K. Jackson, then in command of Cheatham's division, the needful reinforcements, although staff officer after staff officer had been sent for that purpose, Walthall, after a most obstinate and bloody resistance, was forced to yield the Mountain, falling back to the Ridge; and Hooker, on the night of the 25th of November, occupied it and placed himself in co