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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
s wounded, shared the service of Breckinridge's division Saturday morning and evening, and in the final taking of the Federal breastworks. The regiment went into battle 193 strong and lost 75. But the main strength of Georgia in the right wing was in Gist's and Wilson's brigades of Walker's division. This division, which also included Ector's brigade, was commanded by Gist, and the latter's brigade by Col. Peyton H. Colquitt. Joined to Liddell's division— Govan's Arkansas brigade and Walthall's Mississippians —the reserve corps was formed, which was commanded by Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker, one of Georgia's most valorous sons. As before noted, Walker and his corps were on the Federal side of Chickamauga creek Friday night. Early next morning the battle was opened by the attack on Forrest and Wilson's Georgians and Ector's brigade, who were supporting him. Wilson's brigade was immediately under a destructive fire, to which it replied with such vigor as to break the enemy's first l
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
gade, Manigault's Alabama and South Carolina brigade, and Walthall's Mississippi brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson's divisiay between the railroad and eastern base of the mountain, Walthall and French along the crest of the short ridge, French's lt into the field the divisions of Loring on the right and Walthall in the center; French, on the left, being held in supportScott ran the total for Loring's division up to 1,062. Walthall had a similar experience. Cantey's brigade on the right of the failure in the attack of portions of their lines. Walthall's division of Stewart's corps had moved out on the Licksktack in succession by the divisions of Brown, Clayton and Walthall, which constituted the battle of Ezra Church, July 28th, f their numbers, including a number of gallant officers. Walthall, with the divisions of Reynolds and Cantey, attacked withkskillet road and held that line on the left of Lee after Walthall was withdrawn. Here General Loring and General Stewart w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
atastrophe, marched to Columbia, the barefooted and ill-clad men suffering terribly in the intense cold, and during the subsequent retreat fought in the rear guard. Their successful charge upon the enemy's advance near Pulaski on Christmas day, is remembered as an example of heroic devotion. The whole Confederate rear guard was engaged in that charge, and captured a number of cavalry horses and one cannon, a 12-pounder Napoleon. The conduct of the Confederate rear guard under Forrest and Walthall excited the admiration of the enemy, General Thomas declaring that it did its duty bravely to the last. Colonel Olmstead in his report called special attention to Privates P. Murner and A. Vicary, color-bearers of the First and Fifty-fourth Georgia respectively. At the close of 1864 the polls of the State had decreased from 52,764 to 39,863. The State's expenditures for the year had been as high as $13,288,435, and bank capital had decreased nearly one-half. It required $49 of Confed
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
th, Lieut.-Col. Hezekiah Bussey; Twenty-eighth, Capt. George W. Warthen. In Gist's brigade, Col. William G. Foster-Forty-sixth Georgia, Capt. Abe Miles; Sixty-fifth regiment and Second and Eighth battalions, consolidated, Lieut.-Col. Zachariah L. Watters. In Brig.-Gen. Stephen Elliott's brigade, Patton Anderson's division, Stewart's corps—Twenty-second battalion artillery, Maj. Mark J. McMullan; Twenty-seventh battalion, Maj. Alfred L. Hartridge. Col. George P. Harrison's brigade, Walthall's division, Stewart's corps—First regulars, Col. Richard A. Wayne; Fifth regiment, Col. Charles P. Daniel; Fifth reserves, Maj. C. E. McGregor; Thirty-second regiment, Lieut.-Col. E. H. Bacon, Jr.; Forty-seventh regiment and Bonaud's battalion. Artillery, Stewart's corps—Batteries of Capts. Ruel W. Anderson, John W. Brooks and John F. Wheaton. Brig.-Gen. Robert J. Henderson's brigade, Stevenson's division, S. D. Lee's corps—First Georgia Confederate battalion (consolidated with First
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
r-general, and was placed in command at Savannah. On May 23d he was promoted to major-general and sent to command a division in the army operating in Mississippi under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. After the fall of Vicksburg he was ordered to Georgia, in time to share in the battle of Chickamauga. In this great conflict General Walker commanded the Reserve corps, composed of the divisions of Generals Gist and Liddell. On Sunday morning he attacked the Federal left with part of his command, Walthall's brigade having been detached to another part of the line. General Walker reported that when ordered forward Sunday morning, Gist's division moved with Govan, of Liddell's division, on right, Breckinridge and Cheatham in the rear and on General Gist's left. He continued: I owe it to myself and to the gallant command under me to state that when I reported to General [D. H.] Hill, had he permitted me to fight my Reserve corps according to my own judgment, and had not disintegrated it, as h