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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 1 1 Browse Search
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petition of Messrs. Nathaniel Wade and Peter Tufts, in behalf of the inhabitants of Meadford, the Court grants their request, and declares that Mead-ford hath been, and is, a peculiar town, and have power as other towns as to prudentials. To illustrate what direction the laws and regulations of Medford must have generally taken, it will be necessary to know those one hundred laws established by the General Court in 1641, and called The body of liberties These laws were drawn up by Rev. Nathaniel Ward, of Ipswich, and Rev. John Cotton, of Boston, as the most competent men. To show the expansion of their minds and the soundness of their hearts, we will give here two or three specimens of those laws:-- There shall never be any bond slavery or villanage.--If any good people are flying from their oppressors, they shall be succored. --There shall be no monopolies. --All deeds shall be recorded. --No injunction shall be laid on any church, church-officer, or member, in point of doctri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dean, John Ward, 1815- (search)
Dean, John Ward, 1815- Historian; born in Wiscasset, Me., March 13, 1815; became librarian of the New England Historical Genealogical Society, and edited 9 volumes of its Register. He has also written Memoir of Rev. Nathaniel Ward; Michael Wigglesworth; Story of the embarkation of Cromwell and his friends for New England, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foreign affairs. (search)
Foreign affairs. On Sept. 18, 1775, the Continental Congress appointed Messrs. Welling, Franklin, Livingston, Alsop, Deane, Dickinson, Langdon, McKean, and Ward a secret committee to contract for the importation from Europe of ammunition, small-arms, and cannon, and for such a purpose Silas Deane was soon sent to France. By a resolution of the Congress, April 17, 1777, the name of this committee was changed to committee of foreign affairs, whose functions were like those of the present Secretary of State (see cabinet, President's). Foreign intercourse was first established by law in 1790. President Washington, in his message, Jan. 8, 1790, suggested to Congress the propriety of providing for the employment and compensation of persons for carrying on intercourse with foreign nations. The House appointed a committee, Jan. 15, to prepare a bill to that effect, which was presented on the 21st. It passed the House on March 30. The two Houses could not agree upon the provisions of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
irely from the Old Testament. It was found that they were not adapted to a state of society so different from that of the Hebrews in the time of Moses, and Rev. Nathaniel Ward, who was familiar with the Roman as well as the Jewish laws, drew up a code which was substituted for Cotton's in 1641. The first article of this code prov and property vested in the citizen should be inviolate, except by express law, or, in default of that, by the Word of God. Governor Winthrop did not approve of Mr. Ward's adaptation of Greek and Roman laws. He thought it better that the laws should be taken from the Scriptures rather than on the authority of the wisdom and justice of those heathen commonwealths. The Body of liberties compiled by Mr. Ward was really the first constitution of Massachusetts Bay. In 1651 Roger Williams and John Clarke were appointed agents to seek in England a confirmation of the Rhode Island charter. Before their departure, Mr. Clarke, with Mr. Crandall and Obadiah
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, Nathaniel 1578-1652 (search)
Ward, Nathaniel 1578-1652 Author; born in Haverhill, Suffolk, England, about 1578; graduated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1603; practised law and preached; became a member of the Massachusetts Company in 1630, and emigrated to the colony in 1634, where he was pastor at Agawam till 1637; took part in the settlement of Haverhill in 1640; returned to England in 1646, and was author of Body of liberties; The simple Cobbler of Agawam, etc. He died in Shenfield, Essex, England, in October, 1652.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: the Puritan divines, 1620-1720 (search)
promise between aristocracy and democracy. the emigrants: the theocratic group-john Cotton, Nathaniel Ward, John Eliot; the democratic group-roger Williams, Thomas Hooker. the second generation: the pleasantly when the great preacher is set over against the caustic lawyerminister and wit, Nathaniel Ward of Ipswich, author of the strange little book, The simple Cobbler of Aggawam, and chief compught the attention of later readers of the Simple Cobbler; but it was as a subtile statesman that Ward impressed himself upon his own generation, and it is certainly the political philosophy which giv parties to a realization of their responsibility to God, were the difficult problems with which Ward's crotchety lucubrations mainly concern themselves. Authority must have power to make and keuists would case it, and case it, part it, and part it; now it, and then it, punctually. Nathaniel Ward was no democrat and therefore no Congregationalist. For Church work, I am neither Presbyter
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
2. Although the mother of eight children, she found time to write over seven thousand lines of verse in what must have been, to her, peculiarly uncongenial surroundings. Her brother-in-law, the Rev. John Woodbridge, when on a visit to London in 1650, published without her knowledge her poems under the title of The tenth Muse, lately sprung up in America, and a second edition followed in Boston in 1678. That her poems were read and admired is attested by such poetic tributes as that of Nathaniel Ward, who affirms that she was a right Du Bartas girle, and represents Apollo as unable to decide whether Du Bartas or the New England Muse was the more excellent poet. But Anne Bradstreet was not a poet; she was a winsome personality in an unlovely age. That she should have written verse at all was phenomenal, but that it should have been poor verse was inevitable. Her Exact epitome of the four Monarchies, in several thousand lines of bad pentameter couplets, is simply a rhyming chronicle
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
the, 118 Virginia Company, 5 Virginia gazette, the, 117, 118, 120, 121 Vision of Columbus, the, 169, 170 Voltaire, 91, 110, 116, 119, 165, 188 Voyage dans la Haute Pennsylvanie, 199 Voyage en Amerique (Chateaubriand), 212 Voyage to the Moon, 320 W Waldimar, 224 Wales, Prince of (1614), 15 Walker, William, 227 Wallack, J. W., 230 Wallack, Lester, 230, 232 Waller, Edmund, 158, 159 Walsh, Robert, 208, 237 Wandering boys, 231 Wansey, Henry, 202 Ward, Nathaniel, 39-41, 154 Ware, Henry, 350 Ware, William, 324 Warren, 221 Warren, Mrs., Mercy, 217, 218, 218 n. Wars of New England with the Eastern Indians, 25 Washington, 91, 139, 140, 141, 144, 46, 168, 190, 195, 198, 202, 225, 226, 245, 258, 295 Washington and the Theatre, 216 n. Watch-tower, 18 Water-Witch, the, 300 Watson, Bishop, 91 Watteau, 111 Watts, Isaac, 70 n., 159, 160 Way of the Congregational churches Cleared, the, 37 Wayne, Anthony, 203 Ways
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
th African War. 1901. Queen Victoria died. American 1607. Landing at Jamestown. 1608. John Smith's True relation. 1620. Landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. 1620. William Bradford's Hitory of Plymouth plantation. 1626. George Sandys's Translation of the first fifteen books of Ovid's Metamorphoses. 1630-1648. John Winthrop's History of New England. 1640. The Bay Psalm book by Richard Mather, John Eliot, etc. 1640. (The first book printed in America.) 1647. Nathaniel Ward's The simple Cobbler of Agawam. 1650. Anne Bradstreet's The Tenth Muse lately sprung up in America. 1662. Michael Wigglesworth's The day of doom. 1664. New Amsterdam became New York. 1673-1729. Samuel Sewall's Diary. 1675. King Philip's War. 1682. Philadelphia founded by Penn. 1689. Cotton Mather's Memorable Providences 1702. Cotton Mather's Magnalia 1706. Franklin born. 1729. William Byrd's History of the dividing line. 1732. Washington born. 1732.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
ber light, shading down other points too highly illuminated. A fair result will be reached at last. But the great light was a pleasant thing. doggerel, shows that even the Puritans could smile as they regarded some of their discomforts. Nathaniel Ward See also Book I, Chap. III. wrote The simple Cobler of Aggawam in America (1647), which Moses Coit Tyler called the most eccentric and amusing book that was produced in America during the colonial period, although Ward insisted that it shWard insisted that it should be accepted as a trustworthy account of the spiritual state of New England. John Josselyn, who wrote New England's Rareties (1672), declared that most of what he wrote was true; he admits that some things which he recorded he had heard but not seen: for example, that Indians commonly carry on their discussions in perfect hexameter verse, extempore, and that in New England there is a species of frog which chirps in the spring like swallows and croaks like toads in autumn, some of which when
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