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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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and Bay Point. No more peck oa corn for me, No more, no more; No more peck oa corn for me, Many tousand go. No more driver's lash for me, No more, no more; No more driver's lash for me, Many tousand go. Pray on This curious spiritual is one of those arising directly from the events of the war. When the news of approaching freedom reached the sea island rice plantations of the Port royal Islands this chant was sung with great fervor by the negroes. The verses were annotated by Charles Pickard Ware. Pray on—pray on; Pray on, den light us over; Pray on—pray on, De Union break of day. My sister, you come to see baptize In De Union break of day, In de Union break of day. Meet, O lord Meet, O Lord, on de milk-white horse Ana de nineteen vial in his hana. Drop on—drop on de crown on my head, And rolly in my Jesus arm; In dat mornina all day, In dat mornina all day, In dat mornina all day, When Jesus de Christ been born. Meet, O lord: Hilton head in 1861—the time and place of