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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 24 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 3 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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working in a common spirit, to effect a result which was creditable to Massachusetts. Yours faithfully and respectfully, John A. Andrew, To Dr. G. H. Lyman. At the beginning of the war, a memorial was addressed to the Governor, signed by Drs. James Jackson, George Hayward, and S. D. Townsend, asking that none but well-qualified and competent surgeons should receive medical appointments. The memorial was favorably regarded by the Governor; and he appointed Drs. Hayward, Townsend, John Ware, Samuel G. Howe, J. Mason Warren, S. Cabot, Jr., R. M. Hodges, George H. Lyman, and William J. Dale, as a medical commission. Drs. George H. Gay, Samuel L. Abbott, John C. Dalton, and R. W. Hooper were subsequently appointed to fill vacancies caused by death or resignation. This board was charged with the responsibility of examining candidates for the medical staff, and also acted as a board of consultation in sanitary matters, when called upon by the Surgeon-General. Their valuable ser
ments, was the name given to the North-eastern branch of the United-States Sanitary Commission. It was organized in December, 1861, with headquarters in Boston, and continued its work until July 12, 1865. At that time, finding $6,462.14 in its treasury after its debts were paid, it resolved itself into a small committee to expend the residue of the money for the benefit of disabled soldiers, or women and children left by the war without their natural protectors. Its first officers were, John Ware, M. D., president; S. G. Howe, M. D., vice-president: Rev. Rufus Ellis, secretary; and George Higginson, Esq., treasurer. It had an executive committee of seven ladies, the chairman of which was the acting head of the work; an industrial committee of six ladies, whose duty consisted in purchasing material, and getting it converted into garments. The cutting was done by volunteers, and the sewing by poor women, fairly paid for their work by persons of wealth, ready to do the twofold good
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
t doubtless simply due to that overpowering exuberance of boyish spirits which lasted for many years with him, alternating with periods of depression. The best sketch of this little incident may be found in a letter, not before published, addressed to me by an eminent clergyman, lately deceased. June 28, 1893. I was a sophomore, and sat half a dozen seats directly behind him. He came in as usual — it was the day he had been chosen class poet, by one or two votes (I think) over my cousin John Ware--and seemed to regard the occasion as wholly complimentary to himself. His handsome face was richly suffused with the purple glow of youth, and wreathed in smiles, as he rose,--my venerable grandfather [Rev. Henry Ware, D. D.] had with trembling voice just begun the service,--and bowed, smirking right hand and left, to the surprised congregation. It was the affair of a minute: my recollection is that he was soon persuaded to sit down, and only made one more ineffectual attempt to rise
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
D., 34, 58, 67, 191. Ticknor, Prof., George, 14, 27, 117, 121, 122, 191. Tracy, John, 78. Trowbridge, J. T., 65. Tuckerman, H. T., 172. Tudor, William, 44. Tufts, Henry, 30. Underwood, F. H., 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 87. Vane, Harry, 19. Vassall family, 22, 79, 148. Vassall, Mrs., John, 151. Vassall, Col., Henry, 150. Vassall, Col., John, 150, 151. Vassall, Mrs., Penelope, 150, 151. Voltaire, F. M. A. de, 124. Walker, S. C., 113. Ware family, 15. Ware, Rev., Henry, 157. Ware, John, 157. Ware, William, 50. Washington, George, 56. Wasson, Rev. D. A., 104. Weiss, Rev., John, 104. Welde, Rev., Thomas, 7. Wells, William, 150. Wendell, Miss, Sally, 75. Wheeler, C. S., 140. Whipple, E. P., 35. Whittier, J. G., 67, 70, 107, 136. Wigglesworth, Rev., Edward, 8. Wild, Jonathan, 165. Wilkinson, Prof. W. C., 189. Willis, N. P., 33, 173. Wilson, Rev., John, 19. Winthrop, Hannah, 19. Winthrop, Gov., John, 3, 4, 19. Winthrop, Prof., John, 13. Woodberry, Prof. G.
ittle, Simon Greenleaf, J. E. Worcester, John A. Albro, C. C. Felton, Charles Beck, Morrill Wyman, James Walker, E. S. Dixwell, Converse Francis, William T. Richardson, H. W. Longfellow, Edward Everett, Asa Gray, Francis Bowen, Joseph Lovering, John Ware, John Holmes, Estes Howe, William Greenough, Robert Carter, E. N. Horsford, Charles E. Norton. Dr. Holmes remained president until his death in 1837, when Joseph Story was put in his place, Dr. Ware still remaining vice-president. Levi HedgDr. Ware still remaining vice-president. Levi Hedge (Ll. D.) was treasurer until 1831, when, on account of ill-health and expected absence from town, he asked to be relieved from the cares of office, and a special meeting was called to choose his successor. Dea. William Brown was the choice of the society, and he held the post for five years, when, in September, 1836, Dr. A. H. Ramsay was chosen. He held the office with great acceptance for five years. He was again chosen treasurer in 1858, and held the office until 1885, when a special mee
Hannah, b. 16 Dec. 1716, m. Thomas Fessenden of Lex. (pub. 6 Feb. 1734-5); Tabitha, b. 30 Aug. 1718, m. Eleazar Russell before 1742; Solomon, b. 31 Jan. 1720-21. Nathaniel the f. was a brickmaker, and d. 24 Oct. 1722; his w. Hannah m. Jason Winship, 1724. 13. Henry, s. of Solomon (7), m. Elizabeth Rand about 1718; she d. 13 Mar. 1748-9, and he m. Elizabeth Haley of Boston (pub. 21 Oct. 1749). His chil. were Joshua, b. 9 Ap. 1719; Caleb, b. 21 Feb. 1721-2; Martha, b. 27 June 1724, m. John Ware of Sherburn 19 June 1743, and was mother of the late Rev. Henry Ware, Sen., D. D.; Elizabeth, b. 17 Oct. 1727, m. Rev. Amos Adams of Rox., 18 Oct. 1753, and d. before 1776; Thomas, bap. 20 Sept. 1730, d. young; Hepzibah, bap. 23 Jan. 1731-2, m. Rev. Jacob Foster of Berwick, 13 Oct. 1756; Thomas, bap. 6 Oct. 1734, prob. d. 12 Mar. 1735-6; Nathan, b. 8 Ap. 1738, grad. H. C. 1756, a merchant in Berwick, Me., m. Mehetabel Spencer, and d. here 29 July 1769; Sarah, bap. 25 Jan. 1740-41, m. Ch
Hannah, b. 16 Dec. 1716, m. Thomas Fessenden of Lex. (pub. 6 Feb. 1734-5); Tabitha, b. 30 Aug. 1718, m. Eleazar Russell before 1742; Solomon, b. 31 Jan. 1720-21. Nathaniel the f. was a brickmaker, and d. 24 Oct. 1722; his w. Hannah m. Jason Winship, 1724. 13. Henry, s. of Solomon (7), m. Elizabeth Rand about 1718; she d. 13 Mar. 1748-9, and he m. Elizabeth Haley of Boston (pub. 21 Oct. 1749). His chil. were Joshua, b. 9 Ap. 1719; Caleb, b. 21 Feb. 1721-2; Martha, b. 27 June 1724, m. John Ware of Sherburn 19 June 1743, and was mother of the late Rev. Henry Ware, Sen., D. D.; Elizabeth, b. 17 Oct. 1727, m. Rev. Amos Adams of Rox., 18 Oct. 1753, and d. before 1776; Thomas, bap. 20 Sept. 1730, d. young; Hepzibah, bap. 23 Jan. 1731-2, m. Rev. Jacob Foster of Berwick, 13 Oct. 1756; Thomas, bap. 6 Oct. 1734, prob. d. 12 Mar. 1735-6; Nathan, b. 8 Ap. 1738, grad. H. C. 1756, a merchant in Berwick, Me., m. Mehetabel Spencer, and d. here 29 July 1769; Sarah, bap. 25 Jan. 1740-41, m. Ch
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
er, 1833, in Boston, being the youngest son of the late Dr. John Ware, Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine in Harvard University, and of Helen (Lincoln) Ware. He was prepared for college at the Boston Latin School, and entered the Fres disastrous Peninsular campaign had now begun. What part Dr. Ware performed in caring for the sick and wounded that poured Transports we read:— As soon as the whistle is heard, Dr. Ware is on hand (he has all the hard work of this kind to do). . . . . Dr. Ware sees them all, and knows that they have blankets, attendants, and stimulants for the night. When the morn They would fare badly but for the sleepless devotion of Dr. Ware, who night after night works among them, often not leavinleft his home from a sterner and purer sense of duty than Dr. Ware. Military life was repugnant to all his tastes; and somee camp and hospital. From the mass of testimonials to Dr. Ware's memory, the resolutions of his classmates, the votes of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1860. (search)
posures of military life. On the first expedition towards Tarborough, and just before the retreat, he became utterly prostrated by a violent attack of camp diarrhea, and at Hamilton he was ordered by the surgeon to leave his regiment, and take passage down the Roanoke, for Newbern, in a gunboat. I can recall with perfect distinctness his appearance and manner, and the very tone of his voice, his eyes burning, yet full of tears, as he told me what the orders were which he had received from Dr. Ware. Several of his companions said that they had rarely been so much touched as by the sight of Weston's grief and mortification at his separation from his company. During all his military career he was subject to the complaint just mentioned, as well as to the most acute form of neuralgia in the face, which often, for nights in succession, kept him without a half-hour's comfortable sleep. At such times he rarely complained, but would keep as still as possible, and usually went about his
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
apt., II. 407, 408;. Walker, James, Rev. Dr., L 254, 359, 417, 424. Walker, Wise, & Co., II. 13. Ward, Brig.-Gen., I. 17. Ward, N., Dr., I. 67, 69;. Ware, Helen, I. 221. Ware, John, Dr., I. 221. Ware, Robert, Surgeon, Memoir, I. 221-234. Also, II. 200. Warren, G. K., Maj.-Gen., I. 428. Warren, J. M., DrWare, John, Dr., I. 221. Ware, Robert, Surgeon, Memoir, I. 221-234. Also, II. 200. Warren, G. K., Maj.-Gen., I. 428. Warren, J. M., Dr., II. 435. Washington, George, I. 128. Washington, George (Rebel service), II. 434. Wasson, D. A., Rev., I. 188. Webster, Daniel, Hon., I. 3, 20;,21, 23, 62,154. Webster, Fletcher, Col., Memoir, I. 20-28. Also, II. 50, 219;, 221. Webster, Grace, I. 20. Webster, Julia, I. 25. Weems, H. L., I. 128. WeissWare, Robert, Surgeon, Memoir, I. 221-234. Also, II. 200. Warren, G. K., Maj.-Gen., I. 428. Warren, J. M., Dr., II. 435. Washington, George, I. 128. Washington, George (Rebel service), II. 434. Wasson, D. A., Rev., I. 188. Webster, Daniel, Hon., I. 3, 20;,21, 23, 62,154. Webster, Fletcher, Col., Memoir, I. 20-28. Also, II. 50, 219;, 221. Webster, Grace, I. 20. Webster, Julia, I. 25. Weems, H. L., I. 128. Weiss, John. Rev., I. 40. Weitzel, G., Maj.-Gen., I. 66. Weld, S. M., I. 132, 327;. Wells, G. D., Colonel, II. 400, 401;, 402, 403. Wells, William, I. 59, 60;. Weston, Calvin, II. 199, Weston, Eliza A., II. 199. Weston, George, Lieut., Memior, II 199-206. Weyman, Isabella, 1. 193. Wharton, Miss, I. 3. Whe
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