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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
nish naval officer, whose fleet was destroyed by Admiral Sampson, July 3, arrives in New York......Sept. 8, 1898 Forty-seventh Regiment of New York ordered to Porto Rico for garrison duty......Oct. 3, 1898 Abraham Oakey Hall, lawyer, born 1826, dies at New York City......Oct. 7, 1898 Justice Wilmot M. Smith decides that the creation of the County of Nassau was constitutional......Oct. 11, 1898 Battle-ships Oregon and Iowa sail from New York for Manila......Oct. 12, 1898 George Edwin Waring, sanitary engineer, born 1833, dies at New York City......Oct. 29, 1898 Chauncey M. Depew, Republican, elected United States Senator from New York to succeed Edward Murphy, Jr., of Troy......Jan. 18, 1899 Heaviest day's business ever transacted on New York Stock Exchange......Jan. 23, 1899 Fire at Brooklyn navy-yard destroys property valued at $1,500,000......Feb. 15, 1899 Rear-Admiral Lord Charles Beresford, R. N., addresses New York Chamber of Commerce......Feb. 24, 1899
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waring, George Edwin 1833- (search)
Waring, George Edwin 1833- Sanitary engineer; born in Poundridge, N. Y., July 4, 1833; educated in public and private schools and took a course in agriculture and agricultural chemistry under Professor Mapes in 1853. He was George Edwin Waring. agricultural engineer of Central Park, New York City, in 1857; planned the present system of drainage there, and was drainage engineer of the park till the Civil War broke out, when he entered the Union army as major of the 39th New York VolunteerGeorge Edwin Waring. agricultural engineer of Central Park, New York City, in 1857; planned the present system of drainage there, and was drainage engineer of the park till the Civil War broke out, when he entered the Union army as major of the 39th New York Volunteers, and later served as colonel of the 4th Missouri Cavalry, till its close. After the epidemic of yellow fever in Memphis in 1878, he changed the sewerage system of the city on an original plan, which was adopted in many cities of the United States. He was a member of the national board of health for many years; was appointed assistant engineer of New Orleans in 1894; and was commissioner of street cleaning in New York City in 1895-98. In 1898 he was sent to Cuba by the government at the h