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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 2 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
d men did their duty faithfully, and nobly sustained the well-earned reputation of the Navy and our glorious old flag, for which they fought so manfully. The conduct of Thomas Gehegan, boatswain's mate and captain of the 11-inch gun, is worthy of mention, as well for the brave example he set his crew as by the faithful manner with which he served his gun, bringing up his own ammunition as soon as the men composing the powder division had been nearly all killed or wounded. Acting-paymaster C. Stewart Warren acted as signal officer. William H. Byrn, captain's clerk, attended to passing my orders. Dr. L. M. Lyon, assistant surgeon, displayed great zeal and promptness in his attentions to the wounded during the heat of the battle. Senior-assistant engineer John Johnson, with his junior assistants, managed his department with skill and ability. To A. P. Cook, first lieutenant and executive officer, I was greatly indebted for his able assistance. Throughout the entire action
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
tchell, E. A. Terrill and A. A. Ward; Midshipman, Walter Abbott; Surgeon, J. S. Dungan; Assistant Surgeon, H. M. Wells; Assistant Paymaster, Casper Schenck; First-Lieutenant of Marines, Wm. H. Hale; Gunner, T. S. Cassidy; Carpenter, John Shannon; Sailmaker, N. J. Hayden; Acting-Masters' Mate, S. S. Beck. Steamer Pinola. Lieutenant-Commander, Pierce Crosby; Lieutenant, A. P. Cooke; Acting-Masters, W. P. Gibbs and J. G. Lloyd; Assistant Surgeon, L. M. Lyon; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. S. Warren; First-Assistant Engineer, John Johnson; Third-Assistant Engineers, P. A. Sassae, Wm. F. Law and J. Everding; Acting-Masters' Mates, C. V. Rummell and W. E. White. Steamer Richmond. Commander, James Alden; Lieutenants, A. B. Cummings and Edward Terry; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, T. F. Wade; Acting-Masters, C. J. Gibbs and F. S. Hill; Acting-Ensign, H. F. Moffatt; Surgeon, A. A. Henderson; Assistant Surgeon, J. D. Murphy; Paymaster, George F. Cutter; Captain of Marines, Alan Ramsey;
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
ers; Acting-Master's Mates, H. D. Burdett and Alfred Staigg; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, S. F. Train; Acting-Assistant Engineer, J. W. Milestead. Gun-boat Pinola. Lieutenant-Commander, James Stillwell; Lieutenant, G. Watson Sumner; Assistant Surgeon, L. M. Lyon; Assistant Engineers, John Johnson, B. B. Clemens, W. F. Law, John Everding and W. F. Pratt; Acting-Masters, W. P. Gibbs and J. G. Loyd; Acting-Masters' Mates, W. H. Thompson, C. V. Rummell and J. G. Rosling; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. Stewart Warren. Steamer J. P. Jackson. Lieutenant-Commander, Henry A. Adams; Acting-Masters, M. B. Crowell, J. F. Dearborn and Wm. Hedger; Acting-Masters' Mates, Wm. H. Howard, Jeremiah Murphy and W. J. B. Laurence; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, T. S. Yard; Assistant Paymaster, H. Melville Hanna; Acting-Engineers, J. B. Morgan and J. D. Caldwell. Steamer Calhoun. Lieutenant-Commander, T. McK. Buchanan; Acting-Master, M. Jordan; Acting-Ensign, H. D. Foster; Acting-Master's Mates,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
battle of Cold Harbor, in which he found General Lee's army less weakened than had been expected by its losses in the battles from the Rapidan to the James. He did not feel that his own army was in condition to operate further against a well-commanded army of veterans posted behind five miles of strong intrenchments. In the first attack on the Confederates at Cold Harbor, Grant's army was severely handled. General Hancock's attack, although at first successful, was finally repulsed, and Warren and Burnside were brought to a stand at the edge of the enemy's rifle-pits. In writing of this battle General Grant says: Our loss has been heavy, while I have reason to believe that the loss of the enemy was comparatively light. The loss, in fact, in three days operations on the Chickahominy, was 7,500 men. No doubt Grant often wished he could have the aid of the gun-boats that had given him so much help in the West; but that was an impossibility. Realizing the fact that he could
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
six to ten thousand soldiers on board, and were accompanied by four gun-boats, this force being for the purpose of flanking him. This idea of the enemy stood the expedition in good stead, for, perhaps, had Taylor known there were only 1,800 effective soldiers, the transports would have been attacked sooner than they were. On the way up the river, the fleet had met with little opposition from the enemy, although parties of soldiers were frequently seen retreating. On one occasion, Colonel Warren's brigade landed at a point three miles above Conchatta Chute and captured a captain and one private. This captured officer had been charged to destroy all the cotton along the Red River as the Union forces advanced. On the return it was seen that this design had been carried out, for the charred remains of many thousand bales, worth millions of dollars, were scattered along the banks of the river, all of which the Confederates might have saved if they had possessed a little practica