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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
anding aloof from the movement which put him in the Senate, but now as always nothing if not critical, and assuming the direction of his public conduct. The first allusion to his silence was made late in February in the Massachusetts Senate, by Warren, February 20. Charles H. Warren, at one time a judge, was a clever lawyer, ready in wit, apt in sarcasm, and sharp in finding an adversary's vulnerable points. He was a person without serious aims and with much levity of character, convivial Charles H. Warren, at one time a judge, was a clever lawyer, ready in wit, apt in sarcasm, and sharp in finding an adversary's vulnerable points. He was a person without serious aims and with much levity of character, convivial in habits, and in full communion with the society and capital of Boston at this period. a very conservative Whig, in a public speech, to which Wilson, the president, leaving the chair, replied that the senator would speak at the proper time. February 24. Wilson's speech, which contains a review of the politics of the period, appeared in full in the Commonwealth, March 1.> The taunt was repeated in the Whig journal Boston Courier, may 28. at intervals, and by Mr. Winthrop in an appendix t