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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 21 1 Browse Search
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sadly needed the tuition money, which would have been in the next term fair remuneration. My object was my profession, and it could not be delayed. I returned to my studies and practised in the Police Court, always carefully attending the sessions of the Superior Court, and coming home to the office to study from the books the questions of law raised at the bar. I so continued until the September term, 1840, for the Court of Common Pleas. The session was held in Lowell, and the Hon. Charles Henry Warren presided. Mr. Smith had quite given up the practice of the law in courts, although he had frequent applications for advice. He advised me to make application for admission to the bar, offering, if I were admitted, to go into partnership with me under my own name, because of his own financial difficulties. As the law then stood, if a student had slept in a lawyer's office for three years, claiming that he was studying law, and his teacher would give him a certificate that he
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
position; and that was all that was done. A council was called and all the colonels but Duryea voted to retire, and Pierce gave the order. The ground it was put upon was that the troops with long marching were hungry. They had actually marched eleven miles; and if Pierce had given the order for them to sit down and take lunch, the enemy would have run away (as is now known they did do), because they would have supposed we had come to stay. A few volunteers headed by Lieutenant-Colonel Warren remained on the field until they could pick up all the wounded. They brought off Greble's gun, and then had to drag the wounded in wagons nine miles. Upon the return to the fort the stories that were brought back were sufficient evidence of the great alarm. Pierce said that there were between four and five thousand of the enemy. These statements will perhaps be better summed up in the way they finally got into the Northern press, through a communication addressed to me:-- Men cann
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
is advantage of position, and that he would wait an attack behind his works. I therefore determined to push on, and put my whole force between him and Richmond, and orders were at once issued for a movement by his right flank. On the night of the 7th, the march was commenced towards Spottsylvania Court-House, the Fifth Corps moving on the most direct road. But the enemy, having become apprised of our movement, and having the shorter line, was enabled to reach there first. On the 8th, General Warren met a force of the enemy which had been sent out to oppose and delay his advance, to gain time to fortify the line taken up at Spottsylvania. This force was steadily driven back on the main force, within the recently constructed works, after considerable fighting, resulting in severe loss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started on a raid against the enemy's lines of communication with Richmond. The 9th, 10th, and 11th were spent in manoeuvring and fighting w
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
n them for months. My proposition to him was, as to Gillmore, to go in by an attack and rush, and I represented to him strongly that Gillmore on his expedition had only rushed at his dinner. Now I think Smith was an efficient soldier in many respects,--although it would seem that I have every cause to dislike the man in every relation of life. But he had one inevitable regular army failing — the vice Assistant Secretary Dana wrote to the War Department See Appendix No. 65. Wright and Warren were accused of: interminable reconnoissances --waiting and waiting, not going at a thing when he was told, but looking all around to see if he could not do something else than what he was told to do, or do it in a different way from what he was told. Fearing lest he might believe, as an excuse for reconnoitring, that Lee's troops had gone into Petersburg or could get there before him, I telegraphed him that since he marched, not a body of troops had passed through Richmond on the Petersb
tery and the pond. They could not get away because it was a marsh towards the river; and they could not go by the pond and up the beach because there was an opening from the pond into the sea. They could not get down to the fort because we were between them and the fort. Therefore Major Reece, their commander, five officers, and two hundred and eighteen men surrendered. Major Reece was brought to me, and from him I learned that he had marched from Bellville near the Weldon road, where General Warren of Grant's army had made his attack, after they had heard we were at Wilmington. He said that that morning as many of his regiment had been put into the bomb-proofs as they would hold, in addition to the garrison which was there before. As the bomb-proofs were not capable of accommodating his other two hundred and eighteen men, they had marched up the beach out of the way of the fire of the navy. I also learned from him that he had been in the fort that morning, and that it had lost b
., pp. 67-73]. [no. 65. see page 687.] near Bethesda Church, June 1, 1864, 5 P. M. (Received 6.10 P. M., June 2d.) As I reported in my despatch of 10 A. M., Warren was ordered to attack a column of the rebel infantry which was passing toward Cold Harbor, but instead of falling upon it in force he opened with artillery, and a two divisions of cavalry, might have led to the dispersal of Lee's army. Both Generals Grant and Meade are intensely disgusted with these failures of Wright and Warren. Meade says a radical change must be made, no matter how unpleasant it may be to make it; but I doubt whether he will really attempt to apply so extreme a remeeral U. S. Grant, City Point: Has been blowing a gale ever since we arrived. Is clearing up a little. We are all ready waiting for the navy. Any news from Warren or Sherman? Benj. J. Butler, Major-General. [no. 116. see page 786.] North Atlantic Squadron, United States flag-Ship Malvern, Hampton Roads, Dec. 13, 1864. M
d prisoner, 597; killed at Bermuda Hundred, 665; quoted upon attack on Petersburg, 702. Walker, Edwin G., Esq., reference to, 974. Wallace, Gen., Lew, 460. Warren, Judge Charles H., examines Butler for admission to bar, 77. Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel, at Big Bethel,271. Warren, reference to, 647, 687, 795. WashburnWarren, Lieutenant-Colonel, at Big Bethel,271. Warren, reference to, 647, 687, 795. Washburn, Israel, Governor of Maine, aids Butler in recruiting, 305. Washburn, Wm. B., elected Governor of Massachusetts, 967. Washington, Gen. Geo., manumits his slaves, 129; anecdote of, 184, 187; acts upon recommendation of military commission, 843. Washington Artillery of New Orleans, 423,510. Washington, N. C., occupied bWarren, reference to, 647, 687, 795. Washburn, Israel, Governor of Maine, aids Butler in recruiting, 305. Washburn, Wm. B., elected Governor of Massachusetts, 967. Washington, Gen. Geo., manumits his slaves, 129; anecdote of, 184, 187; acts upon recommendation of military commission, 843. Washington Artillery of New Orleans, 423,510. Washington, N. C., occupied by Union forces, 617; evacuated, 636. Washington, D. C., visit in December, 1860, 149-160; condition of affairs in 1861,217; Davis might have captured, 219, 221; Lee attacks, 627-628; Gillmore ordered to, 680; Butler moves troops from, 694: Smith visits without Butler's leave, 695; Butler ordered to, 753; powder-boat experiment