hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 26 results in 8 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
rougham and Roebuck; the next to dine with Sir Robert Inglis, the most distinguished Tory now in town; then with Sir Gregory Lewin; then with Cresswell, Theobald, Warren (Diary of a Physician), &c. I cannot content myself by a bare allusion to my dinner at Guildhall and to my day at Windsor. I was indebted for the honor of an invon he is rather short and stout, and with a countenance that seems to me heavy and gross; though I find that many of the bar think of it quite otherwise. I heard Warren Samuel Warren, 1807-1877; author of The Introduction to Law Studies, and Ten Thousand a Year; and member of Parliament for Midhurst, 1856-57.—author of Diary oSamuel Warren, 1807-1877; author of The Introduction to Law Studies, and Ten Thousand a Year; and member of Parliament for Midhurst, 1856-57.—author of Diary of a Physician, &c.—say that it was one of the loveliest faces he ever looked upon: perhaps he saw and admired the character of the man in his countenance. I have heard many express themselves about him with the greatest fondness. He has a very handsome daughter. Williams John Williams, 1777-1846. He was from his youth dist<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
r. 4 Adolphus' and Ellis' Reports, p. 420. This was a case of marine insurance, in which the application of the maxim, causa proxima non remota spectatur, was considered. The case in which Judge Story's adverse opinion was given was Peters v. Warren Insurance Company, 3 Sumner's Reports, 389; s. c. 14 Peters' Reports, 99. Lord Denman, writing to Sumner, Feb. 27, 1839, said: I am greatly obliged by your communication of Judge Story's opinion, which excites a great doubt of the justice of ourstory, Vol. II. p. 379 Lord Denman refers to Judge Story's opinion adverse to the Queen's Bench in a letter to Mr. Justice Patteson, in Oct., 1840. Life of Lord Denman, Vol. II. p. 88. See ante, Vol. II. p. 25, note. The authority of Peters v. Warren Insurance Company has been somewhat shaken by later American cases. General Mutual Insurance Company v. Sherwood, 14 Howard Reports, 351; Mathews v. Howard Insurance Company, 11 New York Reports, 9. See Sumner's reference to Lord Denman's lette
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
young men under thirty or thirty-five have been selected for the service. John Adams wrote in 1816 of these orations Letter to Dr. J. Morse, 5 January, 1816. Works of John Adams, Vol. X. pp. 203, 204:— The town of Boston instituted an annual oration in commemoration of this catastrophe [ the battle of King Street, on the 5th of March, 1770 ], upon the danger of standing armies stationed in populous cities in time of peace, and among the first orators were such names as Hancock, Warren, and Lovell. These orations were read, I had almost said by every body that could read, and scarcely ever with dry eyes. They have now been continued for forty-five years. Will you read them all? They were not long continued in their original design, but other gentlemen with other views had influence enough to obtain a change from standing armies to feelings which produced the Revolution. Of these forty-five orations I have read as many as I have seen. They have varied with all the chan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
horror when, sitting in the garden at Argyll Lodge, I said, It [the United States] must split; the North cannot be tied forever to such a partnership of ruffianism and villany. Lord and Lady Hatherton took an affectionate interest in his health and all that concerned him, and they became his faithful friends. Lords Granville, Aberdeen, and Clarendon were very cordial; the Romillys and Buxtons were most friendly. He was the guest of the Benchers at the Inner Temple, where he met again Samuel Warren, who many years later recalled him as an affable and courteous guest. He made from London brief visits to the Sutherlands at Cliveden, to Dr. Lushington at Ockham Park, to T. Baring at Norman Court, to the Earl of Stanhope at Chevening, to the Archbishop of Canterbury at Addington, and to the Laboucheres at Stoke Park. He met Macaulay several times, as at Lord Belper's, the Duke of Argyll's, Lord Lansdowne's, and Earl Stanhope's. He was invited by Thackeray to dine, and by Charles King
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
r, 265 Ward, S. G., 488 Warden, D. B., 432 Ware, N. A., 434 Ware, William, 75 Warfield, David, 281 Warheit, the, 601 Warner, Anne, 69 Warner, Charles Dudley, 5, 14, 112, 123– 125, 164, 310 Warner, Susan, 69 War powers, 348 Warren, josiah, 437 Warren, Samuel, 308 Warrens of Virginia, the, 267, 282 Wars of Germany, the, 514 Warton, 458 Warville, Brissot de, 430 Washington, 396, 445 Washington and Lee (University), 343, 463 n. Washington College, 343 Warren, Samuel, 308 Warrens of Virginia, the, 267, 282 Wars of Germany, the, 514 Warton, 458 Warville, Brissot de, 430 Washington, 396, 445 Washington and Lee (University), 343, 463 n. Washington College, 343 Washington Square, 98 Watson, 239 n. Watterson, 327 Watts, Isaac, 548 Way down East, 290 Wayland, Francis, 226 n., 413, 414, 434 Ways and means of payment, 436 Wealth of Nations, 431 Wealth vs. Commonwealth, 358 We are seven, 292 Webbe, John, 426 Weber, 467 Webster, Daniel, 101, 337, 346, 347 Webster, Noah, 21, 400, 401, 418, 446, 470, 475, 475-478, 479, 541, 546, 548, 557, 558, 563, 566 Webster, Pelatiah, 429 Weeping willow, the, 512 Weevilly Wheat, 51
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 9., Proceedings of the 275th Anniversary of the settlement of Medford. (search)
Walker, RebeccahBoston, Dec. 26, 1766May 2, 1797 Walker, RuthLexington, Nov., 1765Feb. 24, 1766In family of Nathl. Webb. Walker, TimothyJan. 30, 1791Butcher. Warner, TobiasCambridge, Nov. 22, 1764Aug. 26, 1765Child in family of Josiah Dixon. Warren, MaryWatertown, Nov. 5, 1763June 14, 1764Daughter of Samuel Warren. In family of Isaac Hall. Watson, IsaacCambridge, May, 1770Oct. 8, 1770 Watts, NathanielAug. 31, 1797 Webb, NathanielLexington, Nov. 1765Feb. 24, 1766        Amy (wife)     Samuel Warren. In family of Isaac Hall. Watson, IsaacCambridge, May, 1770Oct. 8, 1770 Watts, NathanielAug. 31, 1797 Webb, NathanielLexington, Nov. 1765Feb. 24, 1766        Amy (wife)        John (children)        Elizabeth (children)        Jotham (children)        James (children)        Sarah (children)        Michael (children) Webber, Patience1735-6 Welch, JamesBoston, Oct. 26, 1761Feb. 16, 1762Irishman. Coachman in employ of Col. Royall. Wheeler, John B.Aug. 31, 1797 Wheelwright, JosephJan. 30, 1791 Whitaker, ElizabethBoston, Sept. 25, 1772 In family of Benj. Hall. White, FrancisWeston, abt. July 9, 1766Nov.
John T Martin; Privates J J Jennings; W E Thomas, Thos W Harlowe; Corp'ls W G McLane, John W Sadler; Privates Collins J Winston, B H Bragg, R S Campbell, A J Wilson. Company G. "Randolph Guards,"--Killed: Sergeants J B Farrar, H W K Davis; Private C C North. Wounded: Serg't P H Pollard; Private Thos North. Company H. "Amelia Minute Men."--Killed. Lt W T Robertson, Sergt J Y Taylor, Corp'l J B Fryser. Private D S Shoemaker. Wounded: Corp'l P L Burton, in both legs, Privates R E Warren; B E Morris, in hip; W W Motley, in foot; Jos Gibbs, in leg; Jas R Holt, slightly, in abdomen. Company I. "Mossingford Rifles."--Killed: Corp'l A T Sullivan, Private E A Carey. Wounded: Sergt J W Thomas, in both arms; Sergt R B Garland, in hand, Corp'ls John T Smith, in shoulder; W G Thomas, in shoulder; Privates F F Cardwell, in leg; J W Thomas, in hip; E B Anderson, in thigh, W T Newcomb, in hip; Travis Newcomb, in side. Company K, "Fluvanna Rifle Grays."--Killed Private Dan'l B
cell bat; Sergt R R Rounce, 55th Va; N G Miller, co C, 44th Ga; M V T Datson, co C, 44th Ga; W V Jones, co C, 44th Ga; W B Smother, co F 55th Va; Corp'l J A Davidson, co C, 14th Ga; Lieut F Lyon, co F, 1st N C; G Taylor, co F, 1st N C; T J Dunn, co G, 34th N C; T R Gilbert, co E, 34th N C; T W Wilkins, co C, 19th Ga; A D Efford, co E, 40th Va; Sergt R Reed, 34th N C; Corp'l V Gordon, 55th Va; J H Philips, 44th Ga; Lt J T Bowhan, 55th Va, (sent corner 7th and Cary;) D P Elderson, 32d N C; Samuel Warren, 48th Ga; J C Coptin, 38th N C; J J Sacry, Purcell Battery; H T Smith, 44th Ga; J M Daster, 44th Ga; C T Armstrong, 38th N C; Corp'l J C Webb, 16th N C; M T Goode, 16th N C; Sergt N H Seisson, 55th Va; J M Scott, 44th Ga; J E Earls, 34th N C; A Francis, 1st N C; J S Hartness, 44th Ga; G Upchurch, 44th Ga; W Thompson, 44th Ga; J M Williams, 44th Ga; Sergt H B Brown, 38th N C; J H Grady, 1st N C; W H Purner, 19th N C; A Bass, 1st N C; H Withrow, 34th N C; C M Cook, 44th Ga; W H Butler, 44t