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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 35 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Sir William 1715-1774 (search)
Johnson, Sir William 1715-1774 Military officer; born in Smithtown, County Meath, Ireland, in 1715; was educated for a merchant, but an unfortunate love affair changed the tenor of his life. He came to Sir William Johnson. America in 1738 to take charge of landed property of his uncle, Admiral Sir Peter Warren, in the region of the Mohawk Valley, and seated himself there, about 24 miles west of Schenectady, engaging in the Indian trade. Dealing honestly with the Indians and learning their language, he became a great favorite with them. He conformed to their manners, and, in time, took Mary, a sister of Brant, the famous Mohawk chief, to his home as his wife. When the French and Indian War broke out Johnson was made sole superintendent of Indian affairs, and his great influence kept the Six Nations steadily from any favoring of the French. He kept the frontier from injury until the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748). In 1750 he was a member of the provincial council. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
uthful breast, which make ambition virtue, and something to the spirit of military adventures imbibed from his profession, and which he felt in common with many others. France, Germany, Poland, furnished to the armies of this Union, in our revolutionary struggle, no inconsiderable number of officers of high rank and distinguished merit. The names of Pulaski and De Kalb are numbered among the martyrs of our freedom, and their ashes repose in our soil side by side with the canonized bones of Warren and of Montgomery. To the virtues of Lafayette, a more protracted career and happier earthly destiny were reserved. To the moral principle of political action, the sacrifices of no other man were comparable to his. Youth, health, fortune; the favor of his King; the enjoyment of ease and pleasure; even the choicest blessings of domestic felicity—he gave them all for toil and danger in a distant land, and an almost hopeless cause; but it was the cause of justice, and of the rights of humanki
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Robert Edward 1807- (search)
ned his army with starvation. He knew that Grant, for the sake of celerity in pursuit, would break up his army into detachments; and Lee hoped, by a bountifully supplied army well in hand, to fall upon these fragments and cut up the National army in detail. Now he was compelled to detach nearly one-half of his army to forage for supplies to keep his forces from starving. Grant, meanwhile, bad taken possession of Petersburg, and his army moved in vigorous pursuit. Sheridan's cavalry and Warren's corps struck the Danville Railway (April 4, 1865) at Jetersville, 7 miles southwest of Amelia Court-house. Some of his cavalry then pushed on to Burkesville Station, at the junction of that road with the Southside Railway. Sheridan now stood squarely across Lee's pathway of retreat, and held possession of his chief channel of supplies from Lynchburg and Danville. Lee attempted to escape by way of Farmville. Sheridan sent General Davies on a reconnaissance, who found part of Lee's army
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisburg. (search)
of Whitefield, carried a hatchet, provided to hew down all images in the French churches. Louisburg must be subdued, was the thought of the New-Englanders. Commodore Warren, in the West Indies, refused to co-operate with his fleet until he received express orders to do so. The expedition sailed from Boston, April 4, 1745, and at Canseau they were unexpectedly joined by Warren on May 9. The combined forces (4,000 troops) landed, April 30, at Gabarus Bay, not far from Louisburg, and their sudden appearance there was the first intimation the French had of the near approach of danger. Consternation prevailed in the fortress and town. The cannon on shore, ley, were dragged, with provisions, on sledges, over a morass; trenches were dug, batteries were erected, and a regular siege was commenced on May 1 (N. S.). Commodore Warren captured a French man-of-war of sixty-four guns, with over 500 men and a large quantity of stores for the garrison. Other English vessels of war arrived, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lovejoy, Elijah parish 1802- (search)
the first assailants upon some slight quarrel; they pelted the troops with every missile within reach. Did this bate one jot of the eulogy with which Hancock and Warren hallowed their memory, hailing them as the first martyrs in the cause of American liberty? If, sir, I had adopted what are called peace principles I might lamenthus: The patriots are routed—the red-coats victorious—Warren lies dead upon the field. With what scorn would that Tory have been received who should have charged Warren with imprudence! who should have said that, bred a physician, he was out of place in that battle, and died as the fool dieth. How would the intimation have been received that Warren and his associates should have merited a better time? But if success be, indeed, the only criterion of prudence, Respice finem—wait till the end! Presumptuous to assert the freedom of the press on American ground! Is the assertion of such freedom before the age? So much before the age as to leave one no ri<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Manassas Junction. (search)
preparation for an offensive movement. They opened a furious fire on the front of the Nationals, and at the same time made a heavy flank movement. Porter's corps, which had been made to recoil by the first unexpected blow, rallied, and performed specially good service. Ricketts meanwhile had hastened to the left. By the disposition of Reynolds's corps to meet the flank movement, Porter's key-point had been uncovered, but the place of Reynolds had been quickly supplied by 1,000 men under Warren. The battle became very severe, and for a while victory seemed to incline towards the Nationals, for Jackson's advanced line was steadily pushed back until 5 P. M. Then Longstreet turned the tide. With four batteries, he poured a most destructive fire from Jackson's right, and line after line of Nationals was swept away. Very soon the whole of Pope's left was put to flight, when Jackson advanced, and Longstreet pushed his heavy columns against Pope's centre. At the same time Lee's artill
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 (search)
Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 Naval officer; born in Ireland, in 1702; entered the British navy in 1727, and was commodore in 1745, when he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, joining the land forces from Massachusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Stchusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Stephen De Lancey, of New York, and became the owner of a large tract of land in the Mohawk region, in charge of which he placed his nephew, William Johnson, afterwards Sir William. Sir Peter died in Ireland, July 29, 1752.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weldon Railroad, the (search)
he possession of the Weldon Railroad, which connected Richmond with the South. Warren, with the 5th Corps, reached the railroad without opposition. Leaving Griffin to hold the point seized, Warren started for Petersburg, and soon fell in with a strong Confederate force, which captured 200 of a Maryland brigade. A sharp fight ensued. Warren held the ground he had gained, but at the cost of 1,000 men killed, wounded, and prisoners. Lee then sent a heavy force under Hill to drive Warren fromWarren from the road. Hill fell upon Warren's Hank and rear, held by Crawford's division, and in the fierce struggle that ensued the Confederates captured 2,500 of the NationalWarren's Hank and rear, held by Crawford's division, and in the fierce struggle that ensued the Confederates captured 2,500 of the Nationals, among them Gen. J. Hayes. Yet the Nationals clung to the railroad; and, reinforcements coining up, Hill fled. Warren recovered the ground he had lost and intrencWarren recovered the ground he had lost and intrenched. On the 21st the Confederates returned and assailed the Nationals with a cross-fire of thirty guns, and also by columns of infantry. The assailants were soon de