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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

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emy, who were evidently startled by the appearance of so strong a reenforcement. Butterfield threw the Eighty-third Pennsylvania and Sixteenth Michigan in on the left. McQuade sent the Sixty-second Pennsylvania, Col. Black, in the timber on the extreme right, deployed mainly as skirmishers, and advancing rapidly; also the Ninth Massachusetts, Col. Cass, on the left of the Eighty-third. The Fourteenth New-York having relieved the Second Maine, was joined by the Thirteenth New-York, from Col. Warren's brigade, on our left supported by Berdan's Sharp-shooters, half of whom went in with their Sharpe's rifles, doing sure work at every shot, while the balance of the regiments were held in reserve. Griffin's battery now came thundering in, unlimbered and took position in a twinkling, and commenced throwing shell and shrapnel with excellent effect. The fresh regiments now pressed forward, the Eighty-third Pennsylvania advancing under several volleys, but reserving its fire for close quar
line. Stonewall Jackson's column had formed a junction with Lee, and soon attacked our right with great vigor and pertinacity, but he met a galling fire from Edwards's, Martin's, and Weeden's batteries, which sent him reeling back in disorder. Again he gathered his columns, supported them by fresh troops, again advanced, extending his lines as if to flank our right, and renewed the attack with greater ferocity than ever, to be again repulsed with terrible slaughter. Sykes's regulars, and Warren's brigade, in which are the Duryea Zouaves and Bendix's Tenth New-York regiment, played a brilliant part in this portion of the engagement, the Zouaves especially fighting with a desperation and tenacity only to be expected from such superior men. they suffered largely, their peculiar uniform being the especial mark of ten thousand rebel soldiers. The flank movement of the enemy against our right did not succeed. We extended our line at the same time, and when Jackson was repulsed the th
l, and were probably taken prisoners. The officers and men behaved with great courage during the whole time. The following is a list of casualties in the engagement: Major Chandler, missing, and supposed to be wounded and a prisoner. Company A--Killed--Private Julius A. Phelps, of Brookline, Mass. Wounded — H. Finnily, of Boston; J. C. Singer, of Boston; Charles D. Cates, of Brookline. Missing — John O. Dea, of Boston; William Monary, Fernando McCrillis. Company B--Wounded--Lieut. Warren, in arm, slightly; Sergeant W. E. Haywood, bayonet wound, slight; George H. Hanscom, slightly, in hand. Missing — George Barry. Company C--Wounded — S. A. Goodhue, slightly, in the leg; E. B. Nichols, badly, and missing. Missing — George E. Wright. Company D--Killed--Sergeant Fred. Ran, of Boston. Wounded and missing--Lieut. William Sutherland, Sergeant Isaac Williams, Corporal William E. Rice, Private John Kyle. Company E--Wounded--Lieut. Miles Farwell, slight; Sergeant T
shers, which was accordingly done. The skirmishers of the Third infantry then occupied all the open ground in front, extending from wood to wood. The left of our line of skirmishers was hotly pressed at this time, but the line was held until the movement on our right commenced. I then assembled the skirmishers on the right of the turnpike and retired by it, having directed the skirmishers on the left to rejoin me. This they were unable to do, but under Lieut. Sheridan they assembled on Col. Warren's brigade, and were with him in the fierce engagement which they had on the left. With all the men of my regiment I could get together I joined the brigade, which I found formed in front of the Henry and Robertson House. Shortly after we were ordered forward to engage the enemy, who were pressing our left. We had a short and close conflict at this point, and were finally forced to retire, which we did in good order. Subsequently we moved to Centreville, arriving at one o'clock in the
shers, which was accordingly done. The skirmishers of the Third infantry then occupied all the open ground in front, extending from wood to wood. The left of our line of skirmishers was hotly pressed at this time, but the line was held until the movement on our right commenced. I then assembled the skirmishers on the right of the turnpike and retired by it, having directed the skirmishers on the left to rejoin me. This they were unable to do, but under Lieut. Sheridan they assembled on Col. Warren's brigade, and were with him in the fierce engagement which they had on the left. With all the men of my regiment I could get together I joined the brigade, which I found formed in front of the Henry and Robertson House. Shortly after we were ordered forward to engage the enemy, who were pressing our left. We had a short and close conflict at this point, and were finally forced to retire, which we did in good order. Subsequently we moved to Centreville, arriving at one o'clock in the
our thousand, at Lone Jack, at seven o'clock P. M. on the fifteenth instant. On the morning of the sixteenth the rebel forces attacked Major Foster with six hundred State militia at Lone Jack, defeating him, and captured two pieces of artillery. The loss on each side was about fifty killed and seventy-five to one hundred wounded. Among the latter was Major Foster. Foster's command made a gallant fight, and were only defeated by overwhelming force. On my arrival at Lone Jack I found General Warren with a command of eight hundred, consisting of the First Missouri and First Iowa cavalry and two pieces of artillery, threatened with an immediate attack by the whole rebel force, the rebel pickets being then in a part of his camp; but on hearing of my approach they immediately commenced a retreat under the cover of night, availing themselves of the shelter of heavy timber for a distance of six miles, crossed our trail in the rear, and made a precipitated flight south. They have never h