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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

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ly across the river. Begun late, Meade's pursuit was active enough to have enabled him to strike Lee's flank by debouching through Manassas gap. The attempt was unsuccessful Lee withdrew to Culpeper while Meade advanced to the line of the Rappahannock. It was a duel in points between the two—Lee, for all his small army, altogether the bolder and readier master. The commanders began a race for the possession of the Orange & Alexandria railroad. Lee's gaze was fixed upon Bristoe station. Warren, forming Meade's rear guard, gained success in a brilliant side engagement with A. P. Hill, which enabled Meade to post himself strongly at Centerville. For the moment Lee felt himself foiled. Throwing out a line of troops along Bull run, he destroyed the railroad south of that point and retired at his leisure, a leisure with a certainty of future triumph in it. Meade, quickly leaving Centerville, followed him, repairing the road as he went. Reaching the Rappahannock he crossed, forcing t
ylvania Court House, among which was the death of the gallant Sedgwick, sprang that grim vaunt, I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer. Grant came South through the gloomy Wilderness which, one year before, had so nearly stranded the army of the Potomac. Lee stretched no hand to stop Grant's crossing the Rapidan; he was bent on striking once for the sake of those dreary woods of fortunate Confederate memory. Ewell's corps on the morning of the 5th called a halt to Warren's Federal corps advancing on the Orange turnpike. Though Sedgwick came up to help in the assaults upon the Confederate line, Ewell held fast all day, one corps against two, and blocked the road. Both of the Louisiana brigades were hotly engaged, and they bore their share of the losses. In a counter-attack by his and the Stonewall brigade, toward dusk, the heroic Stafford fell mortally wounded. Afterward, in sorrowfully recounting his loss of 3 generals killed, 4 wounded and 2 captured, E