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Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iv.) (search)
out, and the men began once more to build winter quarters. Thursday, March 9. The Regiment passed in review before Major-General John C. Robinson, our former division commander. Others that were under him participated in the review. [It may be mentioned here that General Robinson later on was lieutenant-governor of New York, and was present at a regimental reunion held at Somerville in 1887. He has since died.] March 14. A review of the whole Fifth Corps took place before Major-General Warren. March 16. There was another review before Secretary of War Stanton. On each of these occasions the Thirty-ninth Regiment acquitted itself well. Saturday, March 25. The Regiment was ordered out about daylight to go to the right and assist in re-capturing Fort Stedman, which had just been taken by the enemy. The division marched back, and near the Gurley House was reviewed by President Lincoln. It was then ordered to the left as support to the Sixth Corps, but as no attack w
a bondman, I suppose. He gave to Harvard College thirty ewe sheep and thirty lambs, and to the Church of Charlestown his remaining interest in the twenty cow commons above mentioned. His wife, Mary, died 1674, and she gave to the church a shop adjoining the meeting-house. She had, in 1671, loaned this shop to the church for its benefit. This land (our locus) remained in the ownership of this church till 1833, when John Doane, Jr., sole deacon of the First church in Charlestown, and Isaac Warren and John Soley, a committee for the purpose, by deed dated May 18, 1833, for $1,800 conveyed the whole twelve acres to Patrick T. Jackson, who was acting in the interest of the Boston & Lowell Railroad. Its history from this time Mr. Sargent has given. I do not recollect that any land was conveyed to Mr. Jackson by the Ireland family, except a parcel of land called the stone-pit, where Granite Street now is; which contained the only granite in Somerville, I am told, and from which pr
s Association, Somerville, 22. Veteran Reserve Corps, 12, 14. Vicksburg, 53, 58, 61. Virginia, 49. Vinal, Anna P., 72. Vinal, Quincy A., 32. Vinal, Robert A., 32, 75. Ward, Artemas, 34. Ward, Eliza D., 30. Warner, N. H., 21. Warren, Isaac, 78. Warren, Major-General, 9. Washington, D. C., 11. Washington, George, 23. Waterford, Me., 34. Waters, Elizabeth A., 72. Watertown, Mass., 87. Watson, William W., 69. Watts, Samuel, 65. Wayne, Charlotte, 30. Wayne, Eliza, 30. Warren, Major-General, 9. Washington, D. C., 11. Washington, George, 23. Waterford, Me., 34. Waters, Elizabeth A., 72. Watertown, Mass., 87. Watson, William W., 69. Watts, Samuel, 65. Wayne, Charlotte, 30. Wayne, Eliza, 30. Weitzel, General, 53, 59, 60. Weldon Railroad, 5, 6, 7, 14. Welles, Mr., 62. Wentworth, L. Roger, 77. West Cambridge, 44. Western House, 5. Wheeler, Timothy, 77, 78. Whipple, Ann E., 30, 34, 35. White's Station, 11. Whitmore, Joseph W., 19. Whitney. Moses, 43. Wild, Charles D., 66. Wild, George W., 66. Wild, Rebecca, 66. Willard, J., 65. Willcutt, William C., 19. Winchester, Mass., 88. Winter Hill Road, 26. Winter Hill Universalist Church, 72. Winthrop, John, 78. Wobu