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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. D. Warwick or search for A. D. Warwick in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
ere sent forward to the front. In the early fall of 1861 all three of the regiments, comprising about 3,000 troops, had arrived at Richmond, were organized and armed, and afterwards went into winter quarters along the Potomac in the neighborhood of Dumfries, some thirty miles below Washington. Shall I pause to describe to you this splendid body of men, as they stood for the first time on dress parade on the banks of the Potomac? Wigfall, McLeod and Rainey, of the 1st; Hood, Marshall and Warwick, of the 4th, and Archer, Robertson and Botts, of the 5th, composed the field officers of the regiments, and thirty as gallant captains as ere commissions bore commanded the thirty companies. As far as the eye could reach was a long line of gray. Three thousand bright Texas boys, mostly from eighteen to twenty-five years of age, with Enfield rifles and bayonets glittering in the sun, they presented a spectacle for the admiration of all beholders. The farm, the ranch, the storehouse, the s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Demonstration on Harpers Ferry, from the Times-dispatch, December 9, 1906. (search)
g. The enemy were not yet seen, but we expected to meet them in the next field. Not a shot was fired. Just as our skirmishers got over the fence, and as we with line of battle got to the fence, here came a courier to Colonel Baylor from Jackson to halt. There we stood possibly fifteen minutes, when another courier came from Jackson ordering the line of battle to fall back to the ridge on which we had first formed, and the skirmishers to fall back over the fence. We remained during most of the day and built fires as if we were going into camp. That night the army was in full motion up the Valley. I did not get back to my regiment until I got to Strasburg. Jackson slipped by Fremont a few days later, fought the battles of Harrisonburg, Cross Keys and Port Republic inside of four days, winding up his memorable Valley campaign of 1862. This was the opening of that great campaign, and led to the movement to Richmond. A. D. Warwick., Late First Lieutenant 2nd Virginia Regiment.