Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Washburne or search for Washburne in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

nore, in thus sustaining his power over the entire people, that vital element of republics which proclaims that government derives its just powers from the consent of the governed, and that nearly half of the people were prepared to resist rather than consent to his authority, assumed, as they believed, upon principles at variance with the law as enacted and expounded by the courts of last resort. Mr. Lincoln had already, before the taking of the Little Rock arsenal, written to his friend Washburne, of Illinois, as follows: Springfield, December 21, 1860. Present my compliments to Lieutenant-General Scott, and tell him confidentially, I shall be obliged to him to be as well prepared as he can to either hold or retake the forts, as the case may require, at and after the inauguration. The taking of the Little Rock arsenal produced a revulsion of feeling, which caused those who hoped to keep Arkansas in the Union to abandon that hope. The conviction that resistance by th