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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 18 results in 5 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
l, 62. Vicksburg, surrender of, 305. Vincent, General, killed at Gettysburg, 302. Virginia Convention, 87. Virginia Military Institute, 414. Virginians and Georgians, 336. Volunteer officers, 24. Wadsworth, General, mentioned, 137, 277, 271. Walker, General R. L., 202, 290, 293. Wallace and Bruce, 423. Walton, Colonel, 227. Warren, General Gouverneur K., at Gettysburg, 283; mentioned, 316- 339. Washington Artillery, 214, 227, 230, 233; at Gettysburg, 290. Washington, Augustine, mentioned, 1. Washington, Colonel John A., 116, 117, 121, 122. Washington College, 403, 406, 407. Washington, General, George, mentioned, 1, 6, II, 169, 415. Washington, Lawrence, 1, 10, 11, 13, 26, 71, 80, 137. Washington and Lee University, 281, 413. Washington, Mrs., Mary, 26. Waterloo, battle of, 13. Waterloo Bridge, 182, 184, 186. Wellington, Duke of, mentioned, 171, 228, 247, 278; at Waterloo, 343, 420. Webb's brigade at Gettysburg, 295. Webster, Daniel,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
ple mainly to the northern shores. During the first half of the eighteenth century many treaties were made by the English with these confederated tribes, and some valuable grants of land were obtained on the eastern slope of the Mississippi Valley. About the middle of that century the British government began to recognize the wisdom of Governor Spotswood, and perceived that an empire was soon to be saved or lost. In 1748 a company was organized by Thomas Lee and Lawrence and Augustine Washington, under the name of The Ohio Company, and received a royal grant of 500,000 acres of land in the valley of the Ohio. In 1751 a British trading-post was established on the Big Miami; but in the following year it was destroyed by the French. Many similar efforts of the English colonists were resisted by the French; and during the years 1751-53 it became manifest that a great struggle was imminent between the French and the English for the possession of the West. The British ministers
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
40 George Whitefield comes to Virginia......1740 Richmond incorporated......1742 Augustine Washington, father of George Washington, dies......April, 1743 Thomas Jefferson born in Albemarleo form the Ohio Company, consisting of himself and twelve others, among them Lawrence and Augustine Washington......1748 They obtain a grant of 600,000 acres west of the mountains and south of the st any settlement on the south side of the Ohio......June 13, 1752 Governor Dinwiddie sends Washington (then twenty-one years old) as a commissioner to investigate the proceedings of the French on hington leaves Williamsburg with a few attendants......Oct. 30, 1753 Christopher Gist meets Washington at Cumberland and accompanies him......Nov. 14, 1753 They arrive at Logstown......Nov. 24, embly votes £ 40,000 for the public service; calls out 1,500 men for active duty, and appoints Washington commander-in-chief......August, 1754 Assembly allows Washington £ 300 as a compensation for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Mary 1706-1659 (search)
Jan. 14, 1728) in nearly four years. We have now a young master living with us, who was educated at Oxford, took orders, and came over as assistant to Reverend Kemp, of Gloucester. That parish is too poor to keep both, and he teaches school for his board. He teaches sister Susie and me and Madam Carter's boy and two other scholars. I am now learning pretty fast. Mamma, Susie, and I all send love to you and Mary. This letter from your loving sister, Mary Ball. Mary Ball married Augustine Washington in 1730. Their first child was George Washington, who, when seventeen years of age, wrote the following memorandum in his mother's Bible: George Washington, son to Augustine and Mary, his wife, was born the eleventh day of February, 1731-32, about ten in the morning, and was baptized the 3d of April following. Mr. Beverley Whiting and Capt. Christopher Brooks, god-fathers, and Mrs. Mildred Gregory, god-mother. Early in April, 1743, Augustine Wash- Mary Washington (from an old p
ricksburg, served three years in the Continental army, including the battles of Guilford Court House and Yorktown, and died at Clifton in 1837. By his second marriage, to Marian Morson, of Scottish descent, he had one son, Arthur A. M. Payne, born at Clifton in 1804, who was a prominent man, and widely known as a breeder of fine horses, among them Passenger. He married Mary Conway Mason Fitzhugh, daughter of Judge Nicholas Fitzhugh, of the District of Columbia, and granddaughter of Augustine Washington. The eldest of their six children is General Payne, who has well sustained the ancestral reputation of worthy citizenship, and faithful service, both in civil and military life, in the best interests of the community and the commonwealth. After completing his education in the university of Virginia and preparing himself for the practice of law, he formed a partnership for professional work with Samuel Chilton, at Warrenton. In 1856, at the age of twenty-six years, the ability he ha