Your search returned 51 results in 23 document sections:

1 2 3
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Nathaniel, 1642- (search)
ables and fields had seventy horses in them, and flocks of sheep were on his great plantation, called Green spring. The tendency of such a state of society was obvious to every reflecting mind. It was at this juncture that Bacon arrived in Virginia, and espoused the cause of the republicans. In the summer of 1675 the Indians, seeing their domain gradually absorbed by the encroaching white people, in their despair struck a heavy blow. As they swept from the North through Maryland. John Washington. grandfather of the first President of the United States, opposed them with a force of Virginians, add a fierce border war ensued. Berkeley. who had the monopoly of the fur-trade with the barbarians, treated the latter leniently. Six chiefs. who had come to camp to treat for peace, were treacherously slain by Englishmen. The wrathful savages strewed their pathway, in the country between the Rappahannock and James rivers, with the dead bodies of ten Englishmen for every chief that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ball, Thomas, 1819- (search)
Ball, Thomas, 1819- Sculptor; born in Charlestown, Mass., June 3, 1819; educated at Mayhew School, Boston. In 1840-52 he applied himself to painting. but in 1851 undertook sculpture. He designed and executed the equestrian statue of Washington in Boston, the statue of Daniel Webster in Central Park. New York, and other similar works. In 1891-98 he was engaged on a monument of Washington for Methuen, Mass. He became an honorary fellow of the National Sculptors' Society in 1896. He is thew School, Boston. In 1840-52 he applied himself to painting. but in 1851 undertook sculpture. He designed and executed the equestrian statue of Washington in Boston, the statue of Daniel Webster in Central Park. New York, and other similar works. In 1891-98 he was engaged on a monument of Washington for Methuen, Mass. He became an honorary fellow of the National Sculptors' Society in 1896. He is the author of My three-score years and ten: an autobiography, which attracted much attention.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
e glory of the most brilliant and most varied achievements, who but a week ago was counted with affectionate pride among the greatest benefactors of his country and the ablest generals of all time, has initiated the exercise of more than the whole power of the executive, and under the name of peace has, perhaps unconsciously, revived slavery, and given the hope of security and political power to traitors, from the Chesapeake to the Rio Grande. Why could he not remember the dying advice of Washington, never to draw the sword but for self-defence or the rights of his country, and when drawn, never to sheathe it till its work should be accomplished? And yet, from this ill-considered act, which the people with one united voice condemn, no great evil will follow save the shadow on his own fame, and that, also, we hope, will pass away. The individual, even in the greatness of military glory, sinks into insignificance before the resistless movements of ideas in the history of man. No one c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bank of the United States. (search)
r Hamilton, observing the prosperity and usefulness to the commercial community and the financial operations of the government, of the Bank of North America, Bank of New York, and Bank of Massachusetts, which held the entire banking capital of the country before 1791, recommended the establishment of a government bank in his famous report on the finances (1790), as Secretary of the Treasury. His suggestion was speedily acted upon, and an act for the purpose was adopted Feb. 8, 1791. President Washington asked the written opinion of his cabinet concerning its constitutionality. They were equally divided. The President, believing it to be legal, signed the bill, and so made it a law. The bank received a charter, the existence of which was limited to twenty years. It soon went into operation, with a capital of $10,000,000, of which amount the government subscribed $2,000,000 in specie and $6,000,000 in stocks of the United States. The measure was very popular. The shares of the bank
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bard, Samuel, 1742- (search)
cian; born in Philadelphia, April 1, 1742; son of Dr. John Bard; studied at the University of Edinburgh, where he passed about three years, and was an innate of the family of Dr. Robertson, the historian. Having graduated as M. D. in 1765, he returned home, and began the practice of medicine in New York City with his father. He organized a medical school, which was connected with King's (Columbia) College, in which he took the chair of physic in 1769. In 1772 he purchased his father's business. He caused the establishment of a public hospital in the city of New York in 1791, and, while the seat of the national government was at New York, he was the physician of President Washington. He was also appointed president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1813. While combating yellow fever in New York in 1798, he took the disease, but by the faithful nursing of his wife he recovered. Dr. Bard was a skilful horticulturist as well as an eminent physician. He died May 24. 1821.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barker, Jacob, -1871 (search)
New York when quite Jacob Barker. young, and at twenty-one he owned four ships and a brig, and was largely engaged in commercial transactions. As a State Senator, and while sitting in the Court of Errors, he gave an opinion in an insurance case in opposition to Judge Kent, and was sustained by the court. During the War of 1812 his ships were all captured. Being in Washington, D. C., during its sack by the British (August, 1814), he assisted Mrs. Madison in saving Stuart's portrait of Washington, then hanging in the President's house, which was set on fire a few hours later. Barker was a banker, a dealer in stocks, and a general and shrewd financier for many years. He finally established himself in New Orleans in 1834, where he was admitted to the bar as a lawyer, and soon became a political and business leader there. He made and lost several fortunes during his long life. The Civil War wrought his financial ruin, and late in 1867 he was again in bankruptcy, at the age of eigh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barras, Count Louis de, 1781- (search)
Barras, Count Louis de, 1781- Naval officer; born in Provence, France; was one of the chief officers of the Marquis de Ternay, commander of the French squadron sent to aid the Americans in 1781. He was designated to represent the navy in the conference between Washington and Rochambeau in Wetherfield, Conn., May 23, 1781, but was unable to be present on account of the sudden appearance of the British squadron off Block Island. In September following he effected a junction with the squadron of De Grasse in Chesapeake Bay, and the enlarged French fleet prevented the British fleet from going to the rescue of Lord Cornwallis, and so made certain the surrender of the British at Yorktown. He died about 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barry, John, 1745-1803 (search)
considerable wealth. In February, 1776, he was appointed by Congress to command the Lexington, fourteen guns, which, after a sharp action, captured the tender Edward. This was the first John Barry. vessel captured by a commissioned officer of the United States navy. Barry was transferred to the frigate Effingham; and in the Delaware, at the head of four boats, he captured an English schooner, Commodore Barry's monument. in 1777, without the loss of a man. He was publicly thanked by Washington. When Howe took Philadelphia, late in 1777, Barry took the Effingham Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. up the Delaware with the hope the Delaware with the hope of saving her, but she was burned by the British. Howe had offered him a large bribe if he would deliver the ship to him at Philadelphia, but it was scornfully rejected. Barry took command of the Raleigh, 32, in September, 1778, but British cruisers compelled him to run her ashore in Penobscot Bay. In the frigate Alliance, in 1781,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
banishment......1662 Virginia assigned for thirty-one years to Lords Arlington and Culpeper by Charles II., at the yearly rental of forty shillings......1673 Colonists become dissatisfied with their oppressive and unequal taxes......1674-75 Susquehanna Indians, driven from the head of the Chesapeake, commence depredations on the colonists......1675 These Indians are attacked in their fort, near the present site of Washington, by 1,000 men from Virginia and Maryland, under Col. John Washington, great-grandfather of George Washington......1675 Six Indian chiefs, sent out of the fort for a parley, are killed......1675 Indians escape from the fort and spread dismay and havoc upon the plantations along the James and Rappahannock......1675 Assembly meets and declares war against them. Five hundred men gathered under Sir Henry Chicheley......March, 1676 When about to march, Governor Berkeley orders the force disbanded......1676 Alarmed colonists choose Nathaniel B
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
rd Jeffrey (Hertford). Thomas Longman, Jr. (2 Hanover Terrace, Regent's Park). Arthur J. Johnes, of Lincoln's Inn (4 South Bank, Alpha Road). Petty Vaughan (1788-1854), son of Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, Me. (70 Fenchurch Street). Sir George Rose (Hyde Park Gardens). Robert Alexander (13 Duke Street, Westminster). J. N. Simpkinson (21 Bedford Place, Russell Square). J. Guillemard (27 Gower Street). Graham Willsmore, of Plowden Buildings Temple (1 Endsleigh Street, Tavistock Square). John Washington, of the Royal Geographical Society. John P. Parker, Secretary of the Temperance Society (Aldine Chambers, Paternoster Row). Frederick Foster, whom Sumner met at Wortley Hall. Alexander Baillie Cochrane (4 Burlington Gardens). Lady Mary Shepherd. Sumner's acquaintance with English society was wider and more various than any previously enjoyed by an American, and even exceeded that of most Englishmen. The remarkable favor which he everywhere met was noted at the time, and is still r
1 2 3