Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Washington or search for Washington in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
munitions, guarded by a company of United States troops under command of Capt. Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. The occupation of this arsenal was necessary. The sentiment favoring the seizure was increased by the arrival, on January 10th, of an ordnance detachment, which had been ordered by Col. H. K. Craig, chief of ordnance at Washington, to report at that place after it had been ejected from the Charleston arsenal by the State authorities of South Carolina. Captain Elzey, in his report to Washington of the transfer, said: This movement on the part of Colonel Craig I believe to be wholly unauthorized by the war department. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh producing serious difficulties in this quarter, the people believing it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced mili
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
cer and John K. Jackson. After the war had ended General Wright made his home at Augusta, and edited for awhile the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel. In 1872 he was elected to Congress, but died shortly after, December 21, 1872. In him Georgia lost one of her most illustrious sons. Major-General Pierce M. B. Young Major-General Pierce M. B. Young was born at Spartanburg, S. C., November 15, 1839. His father, Dr. R. M. Young, was a son of Capt. William Young, a gallant soldier under Washington. When Pierce was a small boy his father removed to Bartow county, Ga., and at the age of thirteen years he entered the Georgia military institute at Marietta. Five years later he was appointed to the United States military academy, but he did not conclude his course there on account of the secession of his State. Returning to Georgia and promptly tendering his services to the State, he was appointed second lieutenant in the First Georgia infantry regiment, but declined that commission f