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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
th of the Yazoo to take command of Sherman's Army. This was a surprise to every one, for although it was known that McClernand had received orders to proceed to Illinois and raise troops for the purpose of undertaking the siege of Vicksburg, yet it never was supposed that he would take command of forty thousand men of Grant's Army, without even paying the latter, his superior officer, the compliment of informing him of his intention. However, General McClernand came with such orders from Washington that Sherman unhesitatingly agreed to turn over the command to him. As Admiral Porter did not come under Army rule and knew exactly the terms on which General McClernand had received his orders, he declined to have anything to do with the proposed expedition to Arkansas Post, unless General Sherman should go in command of the troops. To this McClernand agreed, only stipulating that he should accompany the expedition. So the matter was arranged, and the expedition started. The last
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
Steamer Aroostook. Lieutenant-Commander, S. R. Franklin; Lieutenant, T. S. Spencer; Acting-Masters, Eben Hoyt and W. A. Maine; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Pynchon; Assistant Engineers, W. G. Buehler, Geo. R. Holt, James Entwistle and Samuel Gragg; Acting-Master's Mates, C. F. Palmer, Louis Hammersley and Edw. Culbert. Steamer Dacotah. Captain, J. P. McKinstry; Lieutenant, G. C. Wiltse; Surgeon, Delavan Bloodgood; Acting Masters, Wm. Earle and W. Moslander; Assistant Paymaster, Richard Washington; Chief Engineer P. G. Peltz; Assistant Engineers, Elijah Laws, G. P. Hunt, Geo. W. Melville and Jas. H. Perry; Acting-Master's Mates, Charles Trathen, Paul Borner, C. H. Chase and C. H. Davidson; Boatswain, G. C. Abbott; Gunner, Geo. Edmond. Steam-frigate San Jacinto. Commander, Wm. Rockendorff; Lieutenant-Commander, Ralph Chandler; Lieutenant, B. P. Smith; Assistant Surgeon, I. W. Bragg; Assistant Paymaster, T. C. Masten; Acting-Masters, John Baker, H. J. Coop and D.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
r's Mates, Wm. Knapp, Jr., Charles Putnam, Wm. Wingood, W. W. Gregg and W. W. Black; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. M. Adams; Second-Assistants, Jas. Renshaw and John Wilson; Third-Assistants, C. S. Maurice, W. W. Vanderbilt and Monroe Murphy; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. R. Webb and G. W. Kidder; Boatswain, Andrew Milne; Acting-Gunner, John. Q. Adams. Steamer Dacotah. Captain, Benj. F. Sands; Lieutenants, G. C. Wiltse and S. D. Ames; Surgeon, Delavan Bloodgood; Paymaster, Richard Washington; Acting-Masters, Wm. Earle and Wm. Moslander; Acting-Ensign, Isaac Francis; Acting-Master's Mates, Paul Borner, Charles Trathen, John McMillen and C. H. Chase; Engineers: Chief, Wm. W. Dungan; Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. H. Dobbs; Acting-Second-Assistants, G. R. Bennett, Wm. Best and Charles Cranston; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. H. Perry and G. W. Wilkinson; Acting-Gunner, Geo. Edmond. Store-ship Brandywine. Commander, Benj. J. Totten; Acting-Lieutenant, S. J. Shipley; Paymasters
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
11 o'clock to-morrow he would open fire again on Charleston. Charleston, August 24th. The enemy's fire on Sumter slackened to-day. The fleet has not participated. At 12 o'clock last night the enemy's guns opened on the city, firing fifteen 8-inch Parrott shells. No casualties resulted. Non-combatants are leaving the city in continuous streams. Appearance of Fort Sumter at the close of the attack. On the 24th of August General Gillmore wrote the following dispatches to Washington: Headquarters, Department of the South, Morris Island, S. C., August 24th, 1863. To Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-chief: Sir — I have the honor to report the practical demolition of Fort Sumter as the result of the seven days bombardment of the work, during two days of which a powerful northeasterly storm most severely affected the accuracy of our fire. Fort Sumter is to-day a shapeless and harmless mass of ruins. My chief of artillery, Colonel J. W. Turner, reports
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
' movements were received at the War Department until they were actually undertaken. To offset this, we will quote from a letter of General Halleck to Banks, dated February 11, 1864: If by this is meant that you are waiting for orders from Washington, there must be some misapprehension. The substance of my dispatches to you was communicated to the President and Secretary of War, and it was understood that while stating my own views in regard to operations, I should leave you free to adopt n. The distance which separated the different commands, the impossibility of establishing necessary communications between them, the absence of a general authority to command them, the time that was required for the transmission of orders from Washington, and the necessity of immediate action on account of the condition of the rivers and operations contemplated for the armies elsewhere, gave rise to embarrassments in organization of forces and in the execution of orders which could not be overc