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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medicine and Surgery in the United States. (search)
ladelphia, and designed especially for the army1788 Doctors' mob in New York1788 New York Dispensary organized Jan. 4, 1791; incorporated1795 Elisha Perkins, of Norwich, Conn., patents his metallic tractors, afterwards known as Perkinism 1796 First original American medical journal, the Medical repository, appears1797 Medical department of Dartmouth College established1798 First general quarantine act passes CongressFeb. 23, 1799 First vaccination in United States performed by Benjamin Waterhouse, professor in Harvard College, on his four childrenJuly, 1800 First vaccine institute in the United States organized by James Smith in Baltimore, Md1802 American Dispensatory published by John Redman Coxe1806 Ovariotomy performed incidentally by Robert Houston in Glasgow (1701) and by L'Aumonier, in Rouen (1781), is performed by Ephraim McDowell, of Kentucky1809 United States vaccine agency established by Congress (discontinued in 1822)1813 Work on Therapeutics and Materia Me
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman), Harvard University in its relations to the city of Cambridge. (search)
ked in its streets, and loved its highways and byways, and written of its elms, willows, and chestnuts, its robins and herons. The very names of Cambridge streets remind the dwellers in it of the biographies of Sparks, the sermons of Walker, the law-books of Story, the orations of Everett, and the presidencies of Dunster, Chauncy, Willard, Kirkland, and Quincy. Cambridge is associated in the minds of thousands of Americans with scientific achievements of lasting worth. Here lived Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse, the first Hersey professor of physic, who introduced the kine-pox into America, and John Winthrop, Hollis professor of natural philosophy from 1738 to 1779, one of the very earliest students of the phenomena of earthquakes, the friend and correspondent of Benjamin Franklin, and the man whose lectures Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) walked from Woburn to hear. For two generations Asa Gray has turned the thoughts of innumerable students of botany, young and old, to Cambridge as th