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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for G. Watmough or search for G. Watmough in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: raid of the Confederate ironclads off Charles-Ton.—attack on Fort M'Allister. (search)
deliberately and knowingly false. If the statement from the papers, as now before us, has the sanction of the captain of the Petrel and the foreign consuls, we can only deplore that foreign officers can lend their official positions to the spreading before the world, for unworthy objects, untruths, patent to every officer of this squadron. Wm. Rodgers Taylor, Captain U. S.S. Housatonic. J. H. Strong, Commander U. S.S. Flag. James Madison Frailey, Commander U. S.S. Quaker City. Pend. G. Watmough, Commanding U. S.S. Memphis. C. J. Van Alstine, Commanding U. S.S. Stettin. The reader may well wonder at the several preceding pages; the proclamation and the refutation at such length. The first-named shows that however able and brave the officers were who signed it, they did not limit their devotion to fighting for the Confederacy; they were willing to go far beyond that. The refutation is inserted somewhat maliciously, to embarrass such persons as either believe what they ch