hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 30 8 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for P. G. Watmough or search for P. G. Watmough in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

or a plunging fire at the moment of collision, and the ship had acquired a speed of twelve knots, when a shell or shot from the enemy passed through both the steam-chests, wholly disabling her boilers, and rendering her powerless. Ten rifle-shell struck the Keystone State, and two burst on the quarter-deck; but most of them struck the hull, being near and below the water line. In the mean time, the Augusta, Commander Parrott, the Quaker City, Commander Frailey, and the Memphis, Acting Lieut. Watmough, kept up a fire upon the enemy, diverting their attention from the Keystone State, which was soon after taken in tow by the Memphis, and drawn away from the fire. The Augusta and Quaker City were both struck in their hulls. The Memphis was only struck in her rigging. The Housatonic gave chase, and a shot from her struck the pilot-house, doing, it is thought, some damage, and carrying away one of her flags. The rebel vessels then passed to the north-ward, receiving the fir
efore us, has the sanction of the Petrel and the foreign consuls, we can only deplore that foreign officers can lend their official positions to the spreading before the world, for unworthy objects, untruths patent to every officer of the squadron. Wm. Rogers Taylor, Commanding United States Steamer Housatonic. J. H. Strong, Commanding United States Steamer Flag. Jas. Mad. Frailet, Commanding United States Steamer Quaker City. E. G. Parrott, Commanding United States Steamer Augusta. P. G. Watmough, Commanding United States Steamer Memphis. C. J. Van Alstine, Commanding United States Steamer Stettin. headquarters one hundred and Seventy-Sixth Regt., Pennsylvania militia, St. Helena Island, S. C., February 21, 1863. sir: Having seen a proclamation issued by Gen. Beauregard and Commodore Ingraham, to the effect that upon the morning of the thirty-first ult., they had, by force of arms, succeeded in dispersing the blockading fleet which was lying off Charleston harbor, and also